Tattoo Concierge https://www.TattooConcierge.com The Artists' Choice Fri, 10 Nov 2017 06:15:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/cropped-The-Tattoo-Concierge-For-Those-Defining-The-Body-Art-Industry-The-Artists-Choice-Dmonogram-gradient-32x32.png Tattoo Concierge https://www.TattooConcierge.com 32 32 Floral Filigree https://www.TattooConcierge.com/floral-filigree/ Fri, 10 Nov 2017 06:15:29 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46877   Merging three distinct styles of compositions, this side floral artwork including filigree was tailored to accentuate the client’s torso. […]

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Floral Text | Freshly Shot Abstract Ink Brush Side Torso Flower Body Art | Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com
 
Merging three distinct styles of compositions, this side floral artwork including filigree was tailored to accentuate the client’s torso. Starting with very personally meaningful subject specifications in written dedications alongside a single rose, the creating artist then layered ink brush movements with fine line detail concurrent to inverted geometric elements so as to accentuate the foundational focal points. Completed in a single afternoon session this photo was taken immediately following his sitting, hence the more raw texturing of the ‘canvas’. Again, an absolute pleasure and hope your travels home went well

 
 
 
 

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Ink Brush Dragon https://www.TattooConcierge.com/ink-brush-dragon/ Tue, 17 Oct 2017 07:29:31 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46869   Painted first using traditional Chinese calligraphy brushes on canvas, artwork was then re-created on skin. In order to capture […]

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Forearm Ink Brush | Abstract Chinese Watercolor Dragon | Black And Gray | Tattoo Concierge |  www.TattooConcierge.com
 
Painted first using traditional Chinese calligraphy brushes on canvas, artwork was then re-created on skin. In order to capture the correct proportions as well as movements artists typically work off clearly defined foundations. These may include classical compositions of archetypal or traditional Asian dragons. Staying purely with black ink the entire piece was completed in a single session although capturing the splash aesthetic requires significant attention to detail. Again, an absolute pleasure. Thank you for traveling down for the appointment

 
 
 
 

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Ink Brush Octopus https://www.TattooConcierge.com/ink-brush-octopus/ Mon, 09 Oct 2017 01:58:34 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46863   Dark black-work octopus created in abstract watercolor movement, extending from the upper shoulder blade across to the pectoral. This […]

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Abstract Ink Brush Octopus | Half Sleeve Watercolor Blackwork | Tattoo Concierge | The Artists' Choice | www.TattooConcierge.com
 
Dark black-work octopus created in abstract watercolor movement, extending from the upper shoulder blade across to the pectoral. This particular style of painting work is based off actual photographs of the animal which are then essentially re-created within a loose, Chinese ink brush. This highly fluid mixture in tandem with quick rice-paper absorption allows a capturing of the ‘splatter’ effects that so effortlessly lend themselves to the subject matter

 
 
 
 

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Moulin Rouge Paris https://www.TattooConcierge.com/moulin-rouge-paris/ Wed, 04 Oct 2017 02:52:24 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46858   Founded in 1889 along the Boulevard de Clichy. Apparently the original birthplace of the can-can dance the Moulin Rouge […]

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Outside The Moulin Rouge - Paris - The Tattoo Concierge In Support Of Vandalism Galleries | www.TattooConcierge.com
 
Founded in 1889 along the Boulevard de Clichy. Apparently the original birthplace of the can-can dance the Moulin Rouge also started a cabaret trend that spread across Europe at the time. Sending a big thank you for the latest Paris shots, we’re very much looking forward to seeing you there in a few months time! Safe travels ahead

 
 
 
 

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Middle Eastern Portraits https://www.TattooConcierge.com/middle-eastern-portraits/ Tue, 03 Oct 2017 07:36:15 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46845   Detailed black and gray portrait of the commissioning clients’ family member surrounded by flowering branches, crafted in high-detail yet […]

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Detailed Middle Eastern Portrait | Upper Arm Black And Gray Body Art | The Tattoo Concierge  | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Detailed black and gray portrait of the commissioning clients’ family member surrounded by flowering branches, crafted in high-detail yet fine line abstraction. Contrasting her sharper facial focal points, a traditional headdress is in softer almost ethereal layered shading imparting a gentle aesthetic thereby balancing central elements. This upper shoulder portion is the start of a full sleeve composition continuing his personal dedication theme. Thank you once again for traveling all the way over for your sessions and looking forward to seeing your full arm ‘come to life’ as it were

 
 
 
 

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Lucky Money Cat https://www.TattooConcierge.com/maneki-neko-the-cat/ Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:54:09 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46809   Seen as a lucky charm or talisman the literal translation of ‘maneki-neko’ is roughly the beckoning cat. It’s moving […]

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Good Luck And Smooth Thighs | Japanese Inspired Cat Body Art | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Seen as a lucky charm or talisman the literal translation of ‘maneki-neko’ is roughly the beckoning cat. It’s moving paw facing downwards, as traditionally depicted, is a more familiar beckoning motion throughout many Asian regions whereas recent variations to the icon have depicted an upward facing paw to convey the same gesturing concept to Westerners. One of the first recorded instances of a figure that today is commonly recognized as maneki-neko came from around Tokyo in the mid 1800s. Today this lucky kitty can be found everywhere, from key-chains to shop entrances. A pleasure working with you on this whimsical collaboration and wishing you safe travels ahead

 
 
 
 

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Body As Identity https://www.TattooConcierge.com/body-as-identity/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 01:52:52 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46742   Opposed to relatively recent, primarily Western classification of the physical as something to be ‘tamed’ or ‘controlled’ body/art could […]

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 The Body As Identity | Academic Publications | Discussions On Tattooing And Modifications | Tattoo Concierge | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Opposed to relatively recent, primarily Western classification of the physical as something to be ‘tamed’ or ‘controlled’ body/art could be shown as observance of inherent physiological potential alongside subjective description. Aside from long established use in tribal affiliations, rights of passage and clear indications of specific cultural participation the conscious non-adherence to modern social coding standards as displayed by the body reflects an underlying spirit of self-expression through modification. Roots of contemporary prejudice against and indeed novelization of practices may be partially traced back to no more than historically narrow, single ideological obedience. However with this the concept of narcissism must be acknowledged, which will be explored in upcoming entries
 
| ‘The intuitive spirituality of the body and a spirituality that encompasses physical reality as well as unseen psychic energies, although based in ancient practices and beliefs, are gradually entering mainstream thought of the 1990s. The history of body alteration and the nuances of its various cultural and spiritual meanings would comprise a lifetime of research, but a brief introduction is essential to understanding contemporary shifts in attitude toward body alteration. During the Western peregrination toward modernity, ornamental and religious body marking and alteration became associated with pagan barbarism according to the European world view that dichotomized spirit and flesh and sought out reasons to degrade unfamiliar and colonized cultures. Ancient Egyptian culture located spirituality in physical existence, but by the time of Greek civilization the body was considered an inferior manifestation of a more noble and abstract perfect body.
 
Augustine furthered a schism between man’s physical and spiritual existence as he preached the sinfulness of sexual desire and the need to discipline the body. His influence extended through the middle ages and Anglo-European Christian culture began to see bodies as “interchangeable” and “non-essential” to man’s spiritual growth. Acceptance of magical and symbolic use of the body declined. Medieval practices of venerating relics—the preserved body parts of saints and mystics—faded. Physical existence became something to be conquered in order to transcend one’s humanness and become spiritual. Once the body and its desires were discarded, pure spirit could be achieved. Medieval saints who practiced chastity and ascetic activities that punished the body believed they were renouncing the body rather than enlisting it in the journey toward mystical union with God. This is in direct contrast to religious practices that consciously train the body to enter altered states and consider integrating body and mind an essential element of religious ecstasy.
 
Indian Tantrism, for example, rebels against the dualism that proposes asceticism as the path to enlightenment. The Tantric claim that bodily pleasure and spiritual reality coexist creates paths to enlightenment accessible to individuals not ordinarily credited with spiritual capabilities. As one of the Tantras explains, “Ananda (the mind-expanding bliss that is the essence of Reality and Self) is the form of the Brahman (the transcendental Self) and that Ananda is installed in the body.” By validating the body as a spiritual temple necessary to attain enlightenment in a single lifetime, Tantric teachings during the eighth through twelfth centuries encouraged anyone from any social class to strive for spiritual knowledge. The Tantric philosophy of embracing sexual desires and pleasure as a method of obtaining divine communion was, and remains, controversial. Likewise, the medieval mystics caused consternation in the church when they claimed to experience the bliss of divine union without the aid of scripture or church authorities by fasting and flagellating themselves. While the saints may not have known they were democratizing spiritual bliss, the Catholic church probably did. This was probably the basis for Catholic castigation of many of the ascetic women mystics for their extreme and unauthorized practices…
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Stretching https://www.TattooConcierge.com/stretching/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 01:26:38 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46726   Otzi The Ice Man’s remains are dated to around 3300 BCE and currently constitute some of our earliest recorded […]

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 Stretching | To Accommodate Large Jewelry | Encyclopedia | Tattoo Concierge | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Otzi The Ice Man’s remains are dated to around 3300 BCE and currently constitute some of our earliest recorded evidence of body/art practices. His remains were found bearing not only tattoo artwork yet he also had his ear lobes stretched to 0 gauge or 8mm. From the Maasai of Kenya to the Huaorani of the Amazon, stretching portions usually of the ears and lips to accommodate larger jewelry is a long standing modification style. Today ‘plugs’ in the middle of stretched ear lobes may be considered relatively commonplace across a number of mainstream Western-centric cultures
 
| ‘In order to achieve a stretched piercing, typically one first receives a regular piercing in the ear, lip, or other part of the body, and allows that piercing to heal while wearing the starter jewelry. Once the piercing has healed, there are a number of ways of stretching the hole, which usually involve stretching it a little bit at a time in order to minimize tissue damage and pain.
 
Tapering is the most common technique used for stretching, and involves the use of a conical metal rod known as a taper, which is pushed through the hole until the widest part of the taper is even with the skin; larger jewelry is then pushed through, parallel to the back of the taper. Larger tapers, and then jewelry, will be substituted over time as the hole gets bigger. Another gradual method of stretching uses teflon tape. The existing jewelry is removed from the hole and a piece of tape is wrapped around it, forming a slightly larger diameter. As the hole stretches to accommodate the new size of jewelry, the jewelry is removed and more tape is applied.
 
Men and women have been stretching their piercings for thousands of years. Stretched lips into which lip plates or lip plugs are inserted have been worn in ancient Meso-America, South America, among the Inuit and other Northwest Coast Indians, and among a number of tribes in Africa. Stretched ears have been worn in ancient Egypt as well as a number of Asian countries…
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Ink Brush Bamboo https://www.TattooConcierge.com/ink-brush-bamboo/ Sun, 17 Sep 2017 03:00:34 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46706   Working almost in shadows or silhouettes this particular technique of creating bamboo initially paints artwork on rice-paper before transferring […]

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Chinese Ink Brush Painting Bamboo | Side Torso Body Art | Black And Gray | Tattoo Concierge | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Working almost in shadows or silhouettes this particular technique of creating bamboo initially paints artwork on rice-paper before transferring into skin. Using Chinese calligraphy brushes with heavier, pronounced strokes results in a style that is arguably more akin to minimalist abstraction. Offering the strongest contrasts by staying just with black ink, the natural flow of bamboo lends itself very well to not only the torso placement yet could be further complimented by distortion from everyday movement. Congratulations again, we look forward to discussing your next composition

 
 
 
 

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Psychology Of Appearance https://www.TattooConcierge.com/psychology-of-appearance/ Sat, 16 Sep 2017 09:32:36 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46701   Expanding the Guides’ series of academic publications we delve into the psychology of appearance with a first entry exploring […]

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 Psychology Of Appearance | Academic Publications | History Of Research| Tattoo Concierge | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Expanding the Guides’ series of academic publications we delve into the psychology of appearance with a first entry exploring its history of research. Adoption consistently broadening with the industry’s options, today tens of billions are spent annually on all manner of procedures. How tattooing or scarification compare in acceptability to say the whole series of mainstream often invasive cosmetic procedures is an intriguing yet rarely debated distinction. From an historical context the lines between subversive and conventional practices may be argued by some as entirely, subjectively arbitrary
 
| ‘Evidence for the fascination humans have with physical appearance comes from a rich variety of sources, including mythology and legends, anecdotes from history, fairy tales and a variety of contemporary sources. Examples of the interest we as a species take both in our own appearance and the way we present ourselves to others have been derived from as long as 30,000 years ago, when in Africa people chose to decorate their faces, and from examples of portraiture from 23,000 BC…
 
We are also preoccupied with our own appearance. The first true mirrors were made in 1460 by the Venetians, who worked out how to create clear glass. People enjoyed seeing themselves so much that this quickly turned into big business. The del Gallo brothers found out how to create a perfect reflection in 1507, but the Venetians managed to keep the knowledge to themselves for more than a century, despite the efforts of spies and diplomats from other countries who tried to discover their secret. We examine our own appearance thousands of times in our lives, and most of us respond to the urge to check out our reflection in shop windows or mirrors when the opportunity arises. The sight of our familiar appearance does much to reassure us about our identity; however, we are taken aback when our appearance does not conform to our own internalized self-image – for example when harsh lighting offers a version of ourselves which appears older than our internalized self-view, or when others claim that a photo we consider unflattering is in fact a good likeness. Physical changes to the body, and in particular the face, powerfully affect the way we experience ourselves and take some time to assimilate into our self-view.
 
This phenomenon is recognized by health care professionals who carefully manage the first post-operative glimpse in a mirror following major trauma or surgery. Those affected can be shocked for some time afterwards when catching sight of an unexpected image… Whatever our personal beliefs, most of us actively attempt to influence the way we look (for example, through our choice of clothing or hairstyle), either to conform to perceived norms of appearance, or out of a desire to express our individuality…
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Scarification https://www.TattooConcierge.com/scarification/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 01:28:30 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46690   Despite often being relegated to far more ‘fringe’ categorization today as opposed to tattoo arts’ mainstream popularity, scarification has […]

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Scarification | Introduction To Modification Practices | Encyclopedia   | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Despite often being relegated to far more ‘fringe’ categorization today as opposed to tattoo arts’ mainstream popularity, scarification has been practiced across the world for an equally long time. Although notably associated with tribes in Africa and say the Crocodile People of New Guinea, scars from dueling or battle were portrayed as essentially desirable marks of pride in recent Western history. Aside from the patterns’ significance or believed potential influence the sheer fact of voluntarily withstanding pain while undergoing its creation is a statement in and of itself
 
| ‘Scarification refers to the practice of slicing the skin in order to create scars, which are typically joined together into decorative patterns. Also known as cicatrisation, scarification is an analogous practice to tattooing, in that both mark individuals with important social information such as rank, genealogy, marital status, social status, and tribal or clan membership, and both are often performed as a part of a rite of passage, generally enabling the wearer to move from youth into adulthood. Because both practices are painful, wearing a tattoo or scar is a sign of one’s strength and bravery, usually for a man, but sometimes also for women. Finally, both scarification and tattooing are often seen as a form of beautification, without which the individual would be less attractive. Tattooing, however, tends to be practiced by people with relatively light skin, through which the tattoos can show, while scarification, tends to be practiced by people with darker skin.
 
There are a number of different techniques used to create scars. Some techniques involve cutting the skin deeply, either in long lines or short ones, to create a scar. Indented scars are produced by slicing out a piece of skin, usually in a line. Others involve first pulling up a small amount of skin with a hook, and slicing off a piece of the elevated skin. This creates a raised welt, and, when multiple pieces of skin are raised and cut, it creates an overall design that can be quite stunning. Another method is to cut the skin, and afterward insert mud or ash in the cuts, which can leave the scars colored, or can leave raised bumps, known as keloids.
 
In many cultures, especially in Africa, women are more commonly scarred and wear more elaborate designs than men. Often, women’s scars are seen as an indication that she can withstand the pain of childbearing, making her well suited to be a wife. Girls are generally first scarred at puberty, and the face, the shoulders, the chest, and the abdomen are the most common locations…
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Minimalist Watercolor https://www.TattooConcierge.com/minimalist-watercolor/ Thu, 14 Sep 2017 01:41:43 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46660   This aesthetic in particular requiring a far more open canvas the spacing surrounding watercolor strokes highlight brush movements and […]

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Abstract Piano Key Step | Ink Brush Watercolor Painting | Full Sleeve Minimalist Body Art  | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
This aesthetic in particular requiring a far more open canvas the spacing surrounding watercolor strokes highlight brush movements and details. The organic movement of ink, as painted on canvas prior to re-creation in skin, is further accentuated when contrasted by the small series of geometric bars almost reminiscent of piano keys. Needing under one full session to complete this category of composition exemplifies the ‘less is more’ ethos. A true pleasure working with you, we are looking forward to your next concept already

 
 
 
 

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Ideas Of Order https://www.TattooConcierge.com/ideas-of-order/ Wed, 13 Sep 2017 01:21:03 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46641   Quite frequently in body/art it can be argued that the medium overshadows the message. Meaning simply the fact of […]

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Painting By Giorgio Ciam | Ideas Of Order | Artists Describing The Arts | Tattoo Concierge | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Quite frequently in body/art it can be argued that the medium overshadows the message. Meaning simply the fact of utilizing skin or one’s body as the ‘canvas’ in itself becomes critiqued and acknowledged over the subject conveyed or significance attached to the work. Collating choice interpretations and perspectives from a variety of classical artists the author presents substantial rationales for conventional alongside contemporary artwork creation. All of which may be said to, following possible adjustment to canvas choice, remain pertinent for the modern day body artist
 
| ‘Discussing the adaptive functions of human art, Joseph Carroll highlights its role in organizing the capacity of the mind to envision circumstances beyond the immediate. Able to conceptualize future problems and pleasures, to anticipate a multiplicity of outcomes for any event, to speculate about individual motives or group dynamics, and even to foresee their own mortality, humans occupy a mental universe far larger than their actual physical and social environment. “The Brain–is wider than the sky–,” as Emily Dickinson observes. The uniquely anticipatory, creatively constructive characteristics of human psychology have proven to be a source of strength for the species, ensuring “behavioral flexibility” in handling “contingent circumstances”. At the same time, however, these abilities are the source of “potential chaos” and “psychological exile” for the restlessly hypothesizing individual mind. By ordering and interpreting the welter of interior hopes, fears, and schemes, art counters psychic chaos and isolation: deliberately shaped artifacts–in paint, in music, in words–seek to teach, to console, to cheer, or to inspire.
 
The ordered completeness of the imagined worlds artists construct is underscored by their recognition of the fragmented, confusing character of human consciousness. Without assistance such as that supplied by art, individuals tend to become lost in the dismaying multiplicity of their own projections, memories, and hypotheses. The sometimes overpowering richness of the external environment is magnified, on a moment-by-moment basis, by an avalanche of interior responses to it.
 
In consequence, as Wallace Stevens points out, “we live in a constellation / Of patches and of pitches, / Not in a single world” (“July Mountain”). No one has described the “thousand odd, disconnected fragments” comprising individual awareness better than Virginia Woolf: “hanging and bobbing and dipping and flaunting,” the contents of the “rag-bag of odds and ends within us” tease and exasperate. Seeking to understand the self as “nothing but one self,” its life’s experience as “a single, downright, bluff piece of work,” the individual is confronted instead with a hodge-podge of interiority that recklessly overlays sense impressions with the “capricious” effects of memory, apprehension, and desire. The result, Woolf avers, is that “nothing [can] ever be seen whole”: “body and mind [are] like scraps of torn paper tumbling from a sack”. This “chopping up small of body and mind” threatens to annihilate identity: one feels “disassembled” by a myriad of “separate scraps” all simultaneously attempting to define the self and direct its thinking…
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Punk https://www.TattooConcierge.com/punk/ Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:43:03 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46626   Emerging around the 1970’s and described by some as a ‘bricolage of culture held together by safety pins’ – […]

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Punk Movement | The Body/Art Encyclopedia | Tattoo Concierge | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Emerging around the 1970’s and described by some as a ‘bricolage of culture held together by safety pins’ – the punk movement not only practices a variety of body modification it may be argued to have further influenced the modern art forms’ development. From a very broad standpoint the central themes of the ideology are often held to center around individual freedom as well as anti-establishment. Irrespective of individual political affiliations or beliefs, the spirit of self-expressionism echoes an underlying universal
 
| ‘Since punk is an oppositional subculture, punks have historically used forms of fashion and body adornment from the margins of mainstream culture, and that represent the ideology of freedom, nonconformity, antiauthoritarianism, and rebellion, thus the heavy use of ripped and defaced clothing, messy or crazy hair, ugly and loud makeup, and elaborately decorated jackets and jeans. These stylistic elements, when viewed as a whole, created a coherent style that was intended to shock society.
 
Punks have also drawn on the primitivist ideology in their critique of the excesses of Western civilization. For that reason, body modifications popular with the modern primitives scene are often used by punks, and the two movements often overlap significantly. Finally, because punks have typically spurned commercialization, they instead choose to express and reinvent themselves via their own artistic creations with respect to style. Piercings fit perfectly into this do-it-yourself ethos, since many can be done by oneself, at no cost, with simple (although perhaps not terribly hygienic) tools…
 
Tattooing is and has been one of the most heavily used modifications in the punk scene. Because punks often drew indecent words or images on themselves, tattooing is the perfect medium for the expression of countercultural values. Punk tattoo styles were initially drawn from a number of other subcultures such as bikers, rockers, and teddy boys, and, like those other groups, marked the wearers as outsiders to mainstream culture, as well as insiders to the punk movement…
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Eye See You https://www.TattooConcierge.com/eye-see-you/ Mon, 11 Sep 2017 00:39:08 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46611   Single large human eye crafted in high detail on the side / torso. Typically black and white offers the […]

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Realistic Human Eye | Rib Placement | Black And Gray Body Art | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Single large human eye crafted in high detail on the side / torso. Typically black and white offers the sharpest contrasts for these kinds of intricate elements. All too often done below minimum recommended sizes, in order to retain the fine lines over the years to come, this composition is well within the preferred proportions. Whilst the eye itself is sharply realistic, soft almost ink-brush fading was used to transition so as seemingly emerging in to or from the body. Always a pleasure working with you Mikael. We look forward to the next series of concepts

 
 
 
 

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Touching Mind Body And Spirit https://www.TattooConcierge.com/touching-mind-body-and-spirit/ Sun, 10 Sep 2017 04:46:57 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46601   Touching on the concept of body/art transgressing the classical internal-external body barrier, part of the evolving interpretation of these […]

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 Mind Body And Spirit | Academic Publications | The Tattoo Concierge Guide | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Touching on the concept of body/art transgressing the classical internal-external body barrier, part of the evolving interpretation of these practices have deep roots in magical or mystical practices. From religious to physical activities such as Tai Chi or yoga, there exists an underlying belief of consciously bridging a spiritual connection however this may be individually interpreted. The act of body modification may likewise be held as perhaps a cornerstone for many of these more ethereal rituals
 
| ‘The body is a vehicle for interaction between people and consequently often serves as a symbol of society. According to Mary Douglas, “Its boundaries can represent any boundaries which are threatened or precarious.” The body and its treatment may symbolize or directly express cultural conflicts, confusions, religious beliefs, and positive social interactions. Creating an obviously artificial appearance, for example, with body painting, masks, or tattooing, can be seen as undermining the integrity and unity of the classical body. This may be an act of denial of the imperfections of the body, or an act of rebellion against cultural norms of beauty if it is performed contrary to social approval. In either case, it exemplifies a universal desire to be reborn as an object of one’s own making. As part of a cultural system it is proof of an individual’s acquiescence to cultural norms.
 
The connection between control of the body and social structure is made explicit by Mary Douglas in Natural Symbols, although her interpretation needs refinement. Building on the theory of Marcel Mauss who asserted the impossibility of a natural body unaffected by culture, Douglas points out that the acculturation of the body is an intimate reflection of how closely social structures control an individual’s behavior. A social system that maintains stringent control over an individual will require an individual to maintain rigid control over his body. As pressure to restrict the individual increases, man exerts more and more control over his organic processes and becomes alienated from spontaneous behavior. His expression becomes “disembodied” and “ethereal.” Douglas correlates this with religious norms concerning control of the body and consciousness and discusses the difference between religions of control and religions of ecstasy…
 
Crossing the boundary between the internal and external body is particularly powerful. Whenever the boundary between these two domains is crossed, the potential for body magic exists. Many societies consider body orifices targets for dangerous physical and spiritual contamination because they are sites of interaction with the external world…
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Tattoos In Prisons https://www.TattooConcierge.com/tattoos-in-prisons/ Sat, 09 Sep 2017 06:02:34 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46591   From classification to group membership and participation, there exists a rich history of body art amongst convicts. It is […]

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Prison Tattooing | Tattoo Concierge | The Guide
 
From classification to group membership and participation, there exists a rich history of body art amongst convicts. It is often held that the act of separating the ‘felon’ from society quite obviously functions as a type of isolation whereas ink, in particular, conversely re-establishes alternate community participation and agency. The latest entry in the Encyclopedia offers a more lengthy introduction to prison tattooing’s history and uses
 
| ‘Punitive tattooing has been used in the West since the time of the Persians. The Persians, Thracians, ancient Greeks, and ancient Romans all marked criminals and runaway slaves with tattoo marks that often denoted the nature of their crime, or sometimes the punishment (i.e., going to the mines). If tattoos make the body culturally visible, then punitive tattoos, and particularly those on the face, neck, and hands (which were the most common locations historically for punitive tattoos), make the body especially obvious, and more importantly, express, to the criminal, other prisoners, and the outside world, the social position that that body occupies.
 
But at the same time that criminals were marked with punitive tattoos, many prisoners, beginning perhaps with Roman Christians, began marking themselves as well. Sometimes the convict would rework his punitive tattoo to erase the original sign, covering it with something else.
 
But other times, prisoners would create their own systems of tattoos in order to demonstrate group affiliation or pride in their crime or social position.In the West today, tattoos that are created in prison, because of the technology used to create them, the style in which they are worn, and the imagery portrayed, can be easily distinguished from professionally executed tattoos. Prison tattoos can range from technologically simple to relatively advanced. The most primitive method of tattooing is known as hand plucking or hand picking…
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Full Frontal Pastiche https://www.TattooConcierge.com/full-frontal-pastiche/ Fri, 08 Sep 2017 00:33:36 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46571   Reminiscent of the trash-polka aesthetic, this eclectic pastiche combines entirely disparate items into an albeit somehow cohesive design. Using […]

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Chest Piece For Colin | Abstract Trash Polka Eclectic Pastiche | Full Chest And Stomach Body Art | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Reminiscent of the trash-polka aesthetic, this eclectic pastiche combines entirely disparate items into an albeit somehow cohesive design. Using unexpected juxtapositions such as the headless skeleton against the skull-headed raven in flight, graphic alongside wilder amalgamations capture a unique style. Staying with an almost x-ray or stencil texturing only black and red inks were used offering one of the strongest contrasts in body art. Completed in two short consecutive sessions, it was a pleasure creating your latest piece together Colin

 
 
 
 

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Etching Identity https://www.TattooConcierge.com/etching-identity/ Thu, 07 Sep 2017 02:11:32 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46547   The latest portion in the Guide features more lengthy academic publications exploring body modification. Starting a multi-part series with […]

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Identity In Body Modification | Exploring The Practice, Academic Publications | The Tattoo Concierge Guide | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
The latest portion in the Guide features more lengthy academic publications exploring body modification. Starting a multi-part series with Hewitts’ Identity In Blood and Ink, the book offers a fascinating macro historical-sociological, anthropological interpretation of the practices’ multiple forms. The first entry drawing an excellent delineation through established contemporary Western views of participation in the animistic, rather than separating, instead perhaps held as a deeper recognition of the ‘whole’
 
| ‘Marking the human body may be not only the most ancient art form but also the oldest practice of religion as a systematic expression of a belief that unseen extraordinary powers affect the course of natural and human events, and that humans have the ability to affect these supernatural forces. Many ancient cultures inscribed the body with protective symbols and manipulated the body in rituals designed to communicate with gods and spirits. As a form of prayer, this supplication offers the human body as religious text upon which spiritual beliefs can be written and read. Eventually humankind supplemented the language of the body with spoken language, and began to substitute other behaviors for marking and modifying the human body. As the structures of societies changed, religions also changed. Written language gained prominence and in the Western world expansive systems of social hierarchy required new forms of social control. Many contemporary religions still encourage ritualistic fasting, symbolic baptism, and other uses of the body to augment religious devotion, but place more importance on organized churches, leaders, and texts to convey religious doctrine and provide an avenue for participation and redemption.
 
However, in many societies the body has remained the fundamental medium for expressing spiritual beliefs, and an integral part of religious practice. These practices are often disparaged as superstitious, primitive magic by adherents to modem organized religion, rationalists, and many members of the psychological community. The magical world view acknowledges the validity of alternative states of consciousness, which have been dismissed by post-Enlightenment thinkers and pathologized by modem medicine.
 
Only recently have transpersonal anthropologists, psychologists, and ethnologists begun to investigate the pragmatic uses of magical religious practices and beliefs and their real repercussions. If we hope to understand the nature of humankind and their interaction with the cosmos it is important to step beyond the dualistic models of culture versus biology, and body versus spirit. Only then can we realize the implications of religious practices, cultural trends appropriating customs of other belief systems, and the importance of humankind’s compulsion to alter the body…
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Body Art In The Philippines https://www.TattooConcierge.com/body-art-philippines/ Wed, 06 Sep 2017 09:11:43 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46528   The tattooed were first labeled as ‘pintados’ by Spanish explorers, intricate tribal tattooing practices in the Philippines served a […]

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Philippine Body Art | Tribal Tattooing Practices | The Encyclopedia | The Tattoo Concierge Guide | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
The tattooed were first labeled as ‘pintados’ by Spanish explorers, intricate tribal tattooing practices in the Philippines served a variety of purposes including beautification, imparting magical properties across to intimidation during battle. Traditionally created by using the thorns off the calamansi tree as needles, a charcoal mixture was then repeatedly tapped into the skin. There further exist detailed sets of meanings within pattern work, the most infamous being from the famed warriors of the headhunter tribes. Surviving colonial influence the rich traditions of body/art from the Philippines are today held by many as a powerful part of the culture
 
| ‘Tattoos were used to mark important achievements, such as headhunting among men, and also represented age, status, or other socially important features, and were usually started during childhood. Women’s tattoos were primarily done as a decorative practice, to enhance their beauty. Tattoos can also have a magical significance and can be used to protect a person, and these tattoos often use animals like scorpions, snakes, and centipedes.
 
The amount of coverage on the body depends on gender as well as tribal affiliation. Visaya, Kankanay, and Ibaloi men, for example, tattooed their entire bodies, while Visaya women tattooed their hands, and Kankanay and Ibaloi women their arms. As with many Polynesian tribes, the level of coverage often decided how much clothing is worn; when tattoos cover much of the body, typically very little clothing is worn. Igarots tattooed their upper bodies, which resembled chain mail, and the men of the Ifugao tattooed most of the body except for the buttocks, face, and feet.
 
Today, traditional tattooing is rarely practiced as other cultural traditions, such as headhunting, have disappeared. During the annual Pintados-Kasadyaan Festival held every June in the Visayan Islands, the tribes participate in a religious festival that involves a simulation of traditional tattooing, in which dancers paint themselves to resemble no-longer-worn tattoo designs…
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Geometry And Text https://www.TattooConcierge.com/geometry-and-text/ Tue, 05 Sep 2017 00:21:47 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46520   A more futuristic aesthetic, family dedication crafted by combining varying geometric elements, dynamic proportions as well as graphic text. […]

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Graphic Lines With Abstract Geometric Shapes | Text Half Sleeve Body Art | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
A more futuristic aesthetic, family dedication crafted by combining varying geometric elements, dynamic proportions as well as graphic text. The fine line movements draw attention from the disparate fonts so as to contrast words as part of the design itself. It is important to note that regardless of the artists’ skill, no artwork could be ‘printed’ with associated precision. The human body is never a flat or static canvas. With any style or type of composition, movement and distortion with the body remains inevitable

 
 
 
 

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Prison Tattooing As Visual Argument https://www.TattooConcierge.com/prison-tattooing-visual-argument/ Mon, 04 Sep 2017 01:32:53 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46496   Interpreted as part of a more unique context due to the highly specialized environment, the concept of visual encoding […]

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Hard Cases | Prison Tattooing As Visual Argument | The Encyclopedia | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Interpreted as part of a more unique context due to the highly specialized environment, the concept of visual encoding through body/art is one with broad applicability. For example the epideictic functioning of tattoos either inside or outside of prison holds, albeit again with varying identifications. Participation in the art form itself can be argued to function as a reflection of ones’ understanding of their role and possible influence within social space. As neatly summarized “identity does not just happen. Rather, identity is an ongoing process that emerges from individuals’ interpretative and communicative efforts”
 
| ‘The penitentiary offers an intriguing opportunity to engage the rhetoric of the everyday, to investigate how people make arguments–particularly for specific identities and social selves–in the absence of significant (or even any) face-to-face dialogue. The penitentiary also offers an intriguing opportunity to explore the body’s role in visual argumentation. Although visual argument is increasing in popularity and focus among communication scholarship, the role of the body in visual argumentation, particularly the operation of tattooing as visual argument, remains unexplored. Given daily contact with the bodies of others, understanding the ways that bodies argue visually is important to understanding the operations of rhetoric in our lives.
 
Claiming the body as a site for visual argument is not without difficulties and is quite possibly a contentious argument in itself. Scholars traditionally celebrate argument as belonging to the classical public sphere–a wide-reaching construction unhelpful for understanding argumentation as it functions in nonpublic communities. In particular, because the body cannot be fully public and is understood as the antithesis of deliberative discourse, the belief that argument is public axiomatically excludes the body as a site for argumentation. Furthermore, the almost exclusive attention paid to public qualities of argument has obscured the ways in which argument might function in nonpublic but still social settings like the penitentiary…
 
One of visual argumentation’s distinctive features is that claim and grounds are not separate elements but are fused together in a holistic, inseparable unit in which both are “argued and answered in the seeing experience that [the visual argument] structures”. That visual arguments readily can be made, interpreted, and evaluated is an important consideration among populations with high illiteracy rates, as in a penitentiary. Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca restrict argumentation to the “discursive,” with the caveat that this “by no means implies that the technique in question is the most efficacious way of affecting minds”. Indeed, their holism may mean that visual arguments are more, if not the most, efficacious…
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Traditional Samoan Body Art https://www.TattooConcierge.com/traditional-samoan-body-art/ Sat, 02 Sep 2017 08:13:55 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46473   Held to balance the scales for men through pain of undergoing the process as women endure childbirth, traditions of […]

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PE'A | Traditional Samoan Body/Art | The Encyclopedia | The Tattoo Concierge Guide
 
Held to balance the scales for men through pain of undergoing the process as women endure childbirth, traditions of pe’a tattoo artwork in Samoa are said to date back over 2,000 years. An artist is called Tafuga with original implement designs of bamboo alongside wood or turtle shell still in use today. Experiencing somewhat of a modern revival it once shortly fell out of favor following the arrival or European explorers. Commonly requiring three months to complete and one year for healing, pe’a artwork may extend from a mans’ ribs down below the knees
 
| ‘The pe’a is the traditional Samoan body tattoo. Worn by men alone, it covers the body from the torso to the knees. Young men receive the pe’a as a rite of passage, signaling his transition from boyhood to adulthood, and his intent to serve his family and community. Without the pe’a, a man will never truly be a man, and having a half-finished pe’a, known as a pe’a mutu, is considered shameful. A man who gets the full pe’a is a soga’imiti.
 
The process of being tattooed is an intense, painful ordeal which is done over five stages, and could take weeks to complete, given the level of pain and the time needed to recover between stages. It was also costly. Men could not receive the pe’a until they accumulated enough wealth to cover the cost of the woven mats or tapa cloths needed as payment to the tattooist.
 
The tattooing tools, known as au, are similar to those found in many other Polynesian cultures, and consisted of a comb of different sizes, made of sharpened teeth or tusks, lashed to a turtle shell, and attached at a right angle to a stick. The smallest is the au fa’atala which is used to tattoo points and dots. The largest is the au tapulu and is used to fill in the solid design. The comb is dipped into the pigment and is tapped into the skin using a separate mallet, known as a iapalapa….
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Fine Line Floral Sketch https://www.TattooConcierge.com/fine-line-floral-sketch/ Fri, 01 Sep 2017 00:27:17 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46462   Delicately lined, floral bouquet inspired, black and gray half-sleeve. Playing with contrasts between sketch lines and inverted or empty […]

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Fine Line Floral Outlines | Half Sleeve Black And White Sketch Body Art | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Delicately lined, floral bouquet inspired, black and gray half-sleeve. Playing with contrasts between sketch lines and inverted or empty portions the popular draw to this aesthetic is indeed understandable. Although using a comparatively smaller canvas the simple line work is able to convey a sense of organic movement. One subtle distinction is the extension of the branch onto her shoulder blade. This changes the composition from a sticker-like single wrapping over say just the upper arm into a far more natural ‘arrangement’. Our pleasure working with you over the months and congratulations again

 
 
 
 

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Tattooing And Civilizing Processes https://www.TattooConcierge.com/tattooing-and-civilizing-processes/ Thu, 31 Aug 2017 01:46:45 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46451   Positive social implications around body modification are an often poorly addressed or at least often overlooked aspect across many […]

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Tattooing and Civilizing Processes: Body Modification as Self-Control | Discussions | The Tattoo Concierge Guide | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Positive social implications around body modification are an often poorly addressed or at least often overlooked aspect across many industry observers. Centered around individual interviews, primarily in Canada, the interpretations raised touch on the art forms’ practice globally. For example a sense of individualism alongside ones’ participation in a culture may be bolstered through tattooing thereby casts the implications of ‘getting inked’ in a far different light than simply relegating participants as outside the mainstream or somehow negatively separate from the non-tattooed

 
| ‘To voluntarily inflict pain on one’s body and mar the skin with everlasting symbols of impurity is described as overtly antisocial. Such interpretations ring with Judeo-Christian understandings of the body as a sacred “home,” and legitimate Western-scientific theories about tattoo enthusiasm prevalent since the turn of the 19th century.
 
Sociological analyses of tattooing produce a slightly broader spectrum of interpretation than psychological-medical. Yet despite Sanders’ (1989) and DeMello’s (2000) path-breaking analyses of tattooing as a contextual and negotiated signifier of identity, sociological statements on the cultural use of tattoos in North America ultimately (re)produce a conceptualization of the practice as contra-normative. The symbiotic relationship between tattooing and illegal behaviour (or otherwise unconventional lifestyles) still dominates in sociological research. Sociologists prefer to study the subversive subcultural uses of tattooing among groups such as prisoners and youth gangs. Examinations of everyday life in tattoo studios equally “verify” the disreputable nature of North American tattooing cultures. Tattooing is deconstructed as a signifying practice that purposefully embraces and promulgates images of Otherness. It is postulated to be part of what Willis (1978) calls a “homology” of deviant style, that is, a set of complementary group practices coalescing around a shared set of outsider ideologies, activities and representational preferences.
 
With apparent irreverence to Klesse’s (1999), Myers’ (1997), Mifflin’s (1997), Rosenblatt’s (1997), and Atkinson’s (2002; 2003a) claims that non-mainstream forms of body modification foster cultural bonds, few examine tattoos as pro-social markers. The nature of tattooing as a normative practice is rarely considered, because both the pathology of the act and actor is assumed. Reflective of this ongoing tradition of interpretation, there presently exists a giant schism between social scientific interpretations of tattooing and contemporary sensibilities about the act circulated by Canadian practitioners. The dominant manner of analysing tattoos in academic research may, however, be challenged by exploring several of the sensitizing principles of figurational sociology…
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Pacific Northwest Indian Body Art https://www.TattooConcierge.com/pacific-northwest-indian-body-art/ Wed, 30 Aug 2017 01:42:46 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46405   A short introduction to body modification history of Native American Indians across the Pacific Northwest region of America. Often […]

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Pacific Northwest Indians And Native American Body Art Practices | The Encyclopedia | The Body Art World Securely United | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
A short introduction to body modification history of Native American Indians across the Pacific Northwest region of America. Often associated with war for men and social ranking or status amongst women, artworks’ range as well as significance varied widely across tribes. Like many regional cultural traditions the arrival and subsequent influence of European explorers resulted in the marginalization or in some cases cessation of certain procedures
 
| ‘Cheek plugs, labrets, and nose ornaments of all kinds have been found in archaeological sites throughout Alaska, the west coast of Canada, and the Pacific Northwest in the United States. The first European reports in 1769 mentioned women with facial tattoos consisting of lines which radiated from the mouth to the jaw, similar to chin tattoos among other Native American tribes, as well as those which extended from the nose to the ears. Other tattoos included tattooed lines across the foreheads, as well as tattoos on the neck, arms, hands, and feet.
 
Among all the groups, women are more commonly tattooed than men, and for women, the chin tattoo was the most common, received when a girl reached puberty. Transgendered boys, known as schopans in some tribes, were also tattooed with the chin tattoo, and were highly valued as wives. The tattoo technique in the Pacific Northwest Coast was to use a sharp tool to puncture the skin, followed by rubbing soot into the wounds. Certain tattoos were also associated with whaling, but for the most part, tattoos were used as part of rites of passage initiating young women and men into adulthood, protection, status, and identification.
 
In some tribes, both men and women wore labrets, or large plugs inserted into holes below the lower lip, and both men and women had their septum pierced. In some tribes, however, where women wore the chin tattoo, men wore the labret, while in others, only women wore the labret. Labrets were sometimes as wide as the lips, and were made of stone, bone, wood, and ivory. Sometimes bones were worn through the septum piercing and occasionally in the lip hole, and sometimes beads were strung from the septum piercing, hanging down in front of the mouth. Beads were also strung from the labrets (into which holes had been drilled), creating the appearance of a beaded beard…
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Watercolor Jelly Fish https://www.TattooConcierge.com/watercolor-jelly-fish/ Tue, 29 Aug 2017 03:02:37 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46395   Vibrantly colored abstract jelly fish, aptly initially painted using watercolor on canvas prior to being re-created on skin. Starting […]

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Ink Brush Fine Detail Realistic Jelly Fish | Half Sleeve Color Body Art | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Vibrantly colored abstract jelly fish, aptly initially painted using watercolor on canvas prior to being re-created on skin. Starting simply with a concept of somehow portraying the creature within a brush aesthetic, often the most striking collaborations are those where the creator is given significant artistic latitude right from concept stage. Again a genuine pleasure working with you on this composition. Forming part of the TC classics the entire piece was completed in two shorter sessions

 
 
 
 

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Preserving Access To Tattoos https://www.TattooConcierge.com/preserving-access-tattoos/ Thu, 24 Aug 2017 01:23:50 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46374   Centered around an American court case, the latest entry to the discussions page touches on legal considerations pertaining to […]

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Preserving Access To Tattoos | Free Speech Under First Amendment Rights And American Court Cases | Body Art Discussions | Tattoo Concierge Global Platform | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Centered around an American court case, the latest entry to the discussions page touches on legal considerations pertaining to the safeguarding of body/art in light of first amendment free speech protection. Often held as a coverall in fact reasonable time, place and manner restrictions may limit an array of statements. The district court initially ruled ‘that “the act of tattooing” is not protected expression under the First Amendment because, although it is non-verbal conduct expressive of an idea, it is not ‘sufficiently imbued with the elements of communication’. Although judged on different criteria, the paper calls into question a range of assumptions around body/art practices in the country
 
| ‘The First Amendment, as incorporated and applied against the states through the Fourteenth Amendment, prohibits government restrictions on free speech.16 However, within this broad rule rest several exceptions. Indeed, depending on the type of speech, First Amendment protection may or may not apply. In the broad continuum of speech, “pure” speech involves actual expressive activity, such as writing a book or giving a public oration. Pure speech is afforded the most protection under the Constitution. Additionally, conduct that is not “pure” speech but has a communicative aspect, such as burning a draft card, wearing an armband, or distorting the American flag, generally also receives some First Amendment protection
 
Nevertheless, even if speech is considered purely expressive in itself, as opposed to conduct that communicates, such a finding does not give the person a free pass to “speak” in all circumstances. For instance, a city or jurisdiction may be able to regulate the time, place, or manner of the speech, provided such a regulation is (1) content- neutral, (2) in furtherance of a significant government interest, (3) narrowly tailored, and (4) leaves open alternative channels of communication of the information. Expressive conduct may also be regulated under the test promulgated in United States v. O’Brien20 which permits narrowly tailored regulation in light of an “important or substantial government interest” that is unrelated to the suppression of speech. While both pure speech and expressive conduct are considered sacred under die First Amendment, and are at least presumptively protected subject to the various tests listed above, other forms of speech are not afforded similar protection. For instance, conduct that is not “sufficiently imbued with elements of communication,” or in other words, conduct that does not obviously communicate an idea, is not similarly exempted. Likewise, conduct that may have certain harmful effects may be regulated even if the conduct is obviously communicative in nature. For example, adult movie theaters and nude dancing are considered “communicative” in nature but can still be constitutionally regulated and banned in a number of areas…
 
In order for a time, place, or manner restriction to be upheld on free speech grounds, it must be narrowly tailored to serve a significant government interest.95 Anderson did not dispute that the health and safety concerns of tattooing serve a government interest. Rather, Anderson claimed, and the court agreed, that tattooing can be conducted safely, and that the failure of the city to appropriate the proper number of health inspectors cannot be a means to restrict free speech…
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New Guinea https://www.TattooConcierge.com/new-guinea/ Tue, 22 Aug 2017 04:37:10 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46255   The latest encyclopedia entry looks at the island of New Guinea which is roughly the size of California and […]

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New Guinea And Papaua New Guinea | Body Art Practices & Histories | The Encyclopedia | Tattoo Concierge Global Platform | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
The latest encyclopedia entry looks at the island of New Guinea which is roughly the size of California and home to six million whom collectively speak over 800 distinct dialects or languages. Home to what many classify as more extreme body modifications, including the Chambri crocodile people and Kanigara tribe, New Guinea offers a fascinating array of tribal body art practices. Frequently echoing other island tattooing styles such as Polynesian, PNG is still highly unique. With the tolerance of pain throughout often held to protect the participant from future suffering, there remains an undeniable inherent transformative cultural power around the art
 
| ‘Festivals were and are an important part of life for many highland tribes of Papua New Guinea. Many tribes wore elaborate headdresses made of shells, bark, wood, fiber, feathers, hair, and bones for ceremonial purposes, as well as body paint, in order to placate spirits and ensure prosperity. The types of decorations and body paint demonstrated clan membership as well as rank, and at large gatherings such as the annual Mount Hagen Festival, serve to let other tribes know one’s tribal affiliation.
 
Papuan people also pierce their septums and their ears and men wear horns, bones, and tusks through the openings. The Kangi tribe wear bat bones and sweet potatoes in their noses, and other tribes favor pig tusks which make the men look fierce for warfare. Men and women also wear necklaces, armbands, and other types of jewelry as adornment and identification.
 
Some Papuan tribes also practice scarification as part of young men’s initiation ceremonies. Like so many other rites of passage into manhood, Papuan scarification, in which the chest, back, and buttocks are cut with sharpened bamboo, test a boy’s strength, courage, and self-discipline…
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Half Back Ink Brush Calligraphy https://www.TattooConcierge.com/half-back-ink-brush-calligraphy/ Sun, 20 Aug 2017 03:39:54 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46096   Half-back Chinese ink brush calligraphy, traditionally crafted on rice paper using a single thick brush movement for the entire […]

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Half Back Detailed Chinese Ink Brush Calligraphy | Modern Asian Body Art | Tattoo Concierge Global Platform | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Half-back Chinese ink brush calligraphy, traditionally crafted on rice paper using a single thick brush movement for the entire series before the artwork was recreated on skin. The writing merges a combination of the highly stylized ‘grass’ or running script aesthetics alongside a combination of pronounced, bolder strokes. Density of the characters have been purposefully tapered so as to compliment the body’s proportions, narrowing towards the waistline thereby accentuating the backs’ [T] shape. A genuine pleasure working with you over the years M and wishing you safe travels ahead

 
 
 
 

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Skin And Self-Indictment https://www.TattooConcierge.com/skin-self-indictment/ Fri, 18 Aug 2017 05:43:43 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46074   Contrasting a statement of agency within say selected prison tattoo compositions as opposed to displaying proclivities or addictions, the […]

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Skin And Self-Indictment | Tattoos, Race And Addiction | Body/Art Discussions | Peer Reviewed Journals  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Contrasting a statement of agency within say selected prison tattoo compositions as opposed to displaying proclivities or addictions, the psychological as well as philosophical implications for this type of body/art may vary broadly. One of the most poignant viewpoints raised is that of the transitory or fleeting nature found both in the works’ subject matter, such as the rose, which also parallels a life sentence. Highlighting an inevitable chronological limitation of control for both prisoners and guards alike then echoed in ink. The latest entry to the guides’ discussion page offers perhaps a greater depth to these styles of tattoos than is often considered
 
| ‘In decadent phases, the tattoo became associated with the criminal – literally the outlaw – and the power of the tattoo became intertwined with the power of those who chose to live beyond the norms of society. Kathy Acker Empire of the Senseless | The tattoo can be understood as a self-inflicted wound–at once a mark that abjects the bearer, and an assertion of control over abjection …
 
The irreversible reshaping of the body and its permanent marking manifests the stable and static character of relations in society. It also indicates a specific relation to the body as raw material-clay to be molded and a surface to draw on. This does not imply contempt for the body nor does it express particular adoration of the “natural” body image. The body is an unfinished piece of art to be completed. It must be transformed from nature to culture. While any division between nature and culture needs to be distinguished from the idea of naturalness, in which nature is turned into a cultural, artificial construction, it is interesting to note that both Burchett, who left school at twelve, and Falk, a professional sociologist, agree on the essential unnaturalness of tattooing–its orientation toward the cultural rather than the natural, its fundamental disdain for naturalness. In literary texts the tattoo is always used to depict a (Western) character’s movement away from the natural toward the cultural or from the real to the artificial…
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Native American Body Art https://www.TattooConcierge.com/native-american-body-art/ Wed, 16 Aug 2017 04:54:01 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46043   The concept of body/art and modification must further be placed within historical contexts whereas todays practices may be argued […]

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Native American | Body Art Modification History | The Encyclopedia | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
The concept of body/art and modification must further be placed within historical contexts whereas todays practices may be argued to be borne from a far less arduous and painful process. Often causing significant discomfort, even to the point of risking serious debilitating after-effects, historically the belief in these practices’ powers outweighed said risks. Despite only entering more mainstream Western anthropological discourse around 1900 the short overview of Native American body art traditions further emphasizes a universality in the art form itself. As highlighted by Turner, the human canvas offering a stage of ‘pure possibility’
 
| ‘A number of Native American tribes, for instance, used tattooing and tattoos were typically associated with tribal membership, social status, gender, and specific roles. Tattoos were probably brought over with one of the groups of Asian immigrants who came to the Americas from the Bering Strait, possibly between 5000 and 1500 BCE. On the West coast, for example, women often wore chin tattoos that indicated group membership or marital status. Eastern Indians, such as those who lived in Virginia, the Carolinas, and Ontario, often wore tattoos that represented social status, and which were often representational, rather than abstract. Techniques ranged from using sharpened bones or rocks to carve the tattoo into the skin, rubbing into it ash to make a permanent mark, to using porcupine quills dipped in ink, to the use of needles made of fish bones.
 
Some tribes only tattooed women, while others only tattooed men. When men were tattooed, it was often given as a mark of adulthood or to commemorate an important event like a man’s first time participating in a battle. Among other tribes, tattooing was used for spiritual, magical, or medicinal purposes.
 
The Ohlone Indians are Indians who lived on the Pacific Coast between Baja California and the San Francisco Bay Area. Tattooing was mainly done on women, and was mostly decorative. Ohlone tattoos were mostly found on the face but could also extend over the neck, breasts, and shoulders. Some tattoos had magical significance and some had practical uses. Unlike many tribes, Ohlone tattoos were not just black but incorporated the juice from a number of plants to create green and blue pigment as well, which they also used to paint their bodies. Ohlone women got their tattoos when they reached puberty; they noted the girl’s tribal affiliation and lineage, and marked her as marriageable…
| full article

 
 

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Fine Line Geometric Canine https://www.TattooConcierge.com/fine-line-geometric-canine/ Tue, 15 Aug 2017 06:35:00 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46031   Upper thigh fine line body/art utilizing detailed coloring within geometric drafting lines. Somewhat ambiguously based on the canine figure, […]

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Geometric Wolf | Fine Sketch Line Color Upper Thigh Body Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Upper thigh fine line body/art utilizing detailed coloring within geometric drafting lines. Somewhat ambiguously based on the canine figure, either towards a wolf or dog, this sizing and proximity is roughly as close together as lines can be placed so as to retain proportions over the years to come. Completed in a single short session this piece forms part of the TC classics gallery. Thank you again for your patience, it was a pleasure working with you over the months

 
 
 
 

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Tattoos VS Tattooists | Separating The Service From The Message https://www.TattooConcierge.com/tattoos-vs-tattooists-separating-service-and-message/ Mon, 14 Aug 2017 06:08:19 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=46020   A thought-provoking American standpoint on the concept of legally defended free speech being applicable to body/art practices, specifically the […]

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Tattoos Versus The Tattooist | Separating The Message From The First Amendment Right | Body Art Discussions | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A thought-provoking American standpoint on the concept of legally defended free speech being applicable to body/art practices, specifically the message(s) potentially conveyed through tattooing. Essentially found to be a question of terminology whereas one may argue more that the act itself be classified as constituting participation in free speech, there are some logical differentiations that open engaging topics throughout the industry. Separating the service from the constitutionally protected message is the latest entry to the Guide’s discussions page
 
| ‘If all involved in a collaborative process that results in speech are “engaged in expression,” some strange (even absurd) results can occur. For example, if a person went to a barber to have a phrase or name shaved into his head, under this rule, both the barber and the customer would be communicating. This seems ridiculous as clearly it is the customer’s speech and not the barber’s. The barber may have to use his or her creative touch to make the words look nice but he is not speaking in the usual sense of the word. He may help another put his message out there, but the barber is not the speaker. Furthermore, if anyone engaged to help another speak is also speaking, then the friend who applies face paint proclaiming support for a sports team on another is also speaking. The same goes for the person who applies a rub-on tattoo for a friend. These examples may seem silly, but they are all logical outgrowths of the Anderson rationale…
 
Tattooing can be a means for a tattooee to communicate a message to the general public. Despite court efforts to afford wide protection to the tattooing process, the simple truth is that some tattoos, such as cosmetic tattoos or self-expression tattoos, are not communicative. Thus, tattoos generally cannot categorically be labeled pure speech. Because the act of tattooing does not always result in pure speech and because it requires little to no creative input from the tattooist, the process of tattooing can be treated differently from other commissioned arts and can be separated from the tattoo for First Amendment purposes
 
Once the tattooing process is separated from the tattoo, it becomes obvious that the process cannot qualify as either pure speech or symbolic conduct. The tattooist does not convey his or her own message through the tattoo, nor would an audience view the tattoo as the tattooist’s communication. Tattooing may still receive some First Amendment protection as the only means to speak through a tattoo, but this protection may allow more rigorous regulation than if the process of tattooing was protected speech itself. In light of other collaborative processes, this separation becomes necessary to protect the truly dominant speaker and not the one who provided the mechanism for speech…
| full article

 
 

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New Zealand Moko Body Art https://www.TattooConcierge.com/new-zealand-moko-body-art/ Sun, 13 Aug 2017 04:29:10 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=45557   Classified as once a true right of passage taking perhaps years to complete due to the facial trauma and […]

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Ta Moko | Ancient New Zealand Body Art Practices | The Guides' Encyclopedia | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Classified as once a true right of passage taking perhaps years to complete due to the facial trauma and swelling caused by the procedure, New Zealands’ ta moko body/art traditions are indeed fascinating. The artworks’ placement and segmentation conveying highly detailed information about the wearer, Captain Cook considered their practices as ‘one of the most unique and beautiful of all tattoo traditions‘. The latest encyclopedia entry offers a short overview of the islands’ cultural inking genesis
 
| ‘Unlike tattoos in Polynesia and elsewhere which have designs that are worn by everyone of the same tribe, clan, or rank, Maori tattoos were totally individual. While they did indicate a man’s social and kinship position, marital status, and other information, each moko was like a fingerprint, and no two were alike. Maori chiefs even used drawings of their moko as their signature in the nineteenth century. Because the moko in part signified rank, different designs on both men and women could be read as relating to their family status, and each of the Maori social ranks carried different designs. In addition, some women who, due to their genealogical connections, were extremely high status, could wear part of the male moko
 
As in Marquesan tattooing, Maori facial designs were divided into four zones (left forehead, right forehead, left lower face, and right lower face) and these further divided, giving an overall symmetry to the design. The right side of the face conveyed information about the father’s rank, tribal affiliations, and position. The left side of a face, on the other hand, gave information about the mother’s rank, tribal affiliations, and position. Each side of the face is also subdivided into eight sections, which contain information about rank, position in life, tribal identification, lineage, and more personal information, including occupation or skill
 
Tattooing styles varied from tribe to tribe and region to region, as well as over time. Captain Cook, for example, noted during his expedition in 1769 that the men on one side of an inlet were tattooed all over their faces, whereas the men on the other side of the inlet were only tattooed on the lips. He also noted that some moko did not include the forehead but only extended from the chin to the eyes. Also, Cook’s men noted that there was at least one man at that time who had straight vertical lines tattooed on his face, combined with spirals, as well as two elderly men with horizontal lines across their face. Tattoos of this sort were never again seen on subsequent visits. And by the nineteenth century, different styles of moko were seen, including both the classic curvilinear style as well as vertical and horizontal parallel lines…
| full article

 
 
 

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Straight Lined Abstraction https://www.TattooConcierge.com/straight-lined-abstraction/ Sat, 12 Aug 2017 05:36:11 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=45217   Quarter back abstract composition hiding skull profiles within ink brush movements. Centered around a star burst like geometric shape, […]

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Skull Fire And Abstract Watercolor Elements | Lower Back Color Body Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Quarter back abstract composition hiding skull profiles within ink brush movements. Centered around a star burst like geometric shape, inclusion of multiple elements ranging from fine line, antlers to realistic flames makes for a highly eclectic pastiche. Reminiscent of the European trash-polka aesthetic yet comparatively more open or lighter it plays on the bodys’ natural movement rather than solid portion filling. Part of the TC classics it was again a pleasure working with you on this

 
 
 
 

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Branding The Art World https://www.TattooConcierge.com/branding-the-art-world/ Fri, 11 Aug 2017 06:47:52 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=45202   The concept of mainstream medium artist networks as well as associated promotions could in large part be seen to […]

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Contemporary Visual Artists | Branding In The Art World | Academic Exploration | The Tattoo Concierge Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
The concept of mainstream medium artist networks as well as associated promotions could in large part be seen to overlap with the body/art world. Whilst the established channels differ significantly, particularly brick and mortar venues, there is an argument for body/artists’ inclusion into the broader ‘visual artist’ category. With this and in consideration of collectors’ psychology recent market trends may offer an insight perhaps not frequently or commonly considered by numerous practitioners. Originally published just two years ago in the Journal of Media Research, ‘branding in the art world’ is the latest entry to the Guides’ discussion page
 
| ‘Promotion and branding are part of the contemporary artist’s identity and the success on the art market can only be the result of a deliberate strategy involving a new type of attitude towards “the conventional thinking over the work of art and over the artist” and of a different relationship with the art world and most of all with mass-media and the public. As R. Moulin says, the strategy of the newcomers involves a collaboration with one (or more) leader gallery (brand gallery – Gagosian, Gladstone, Haunch of Venison, Yvon Lambert, etc.) which assures their launching and promotion on the market, the acquisition from a great collector (brand collector – Saatchi, Pinault, Arnauld, etc.) – which gives them an international passport – then, the diversification of the galleries, dealers and collectors they collaborate with. An important aspect in the building up of their celebrity persona and their brand is the use of advertising and marketing strategies and a lot of media exposure in articles and professional magazines (Art Press, Frieze, Flash Art, Artforum, New York Magazine, etc.), pages in catalogues (Art Now, 100 Contemporary Artists, etc.) and tabloids
 
The receiving of an important award (Turner Prize, Prix Marcel Duchamp), the participation in major branded cultural events (the Venice Biennial), the insertion of their works and important major exhibitions in brand museums (Tate Modern, Centre Pompidou, MoMa, Guggenheim, etc.) follow. The more the artist’s works are presented in galleries, the more they are purchased by collectors, his / her market share will increase and the rhythm of selling as well: “If the artist can create enough work to show simultaneously at several galleries and art fairs, the greater buzz produces higher prices. Each show, each fair, each mention in an art magazine, each critical appraisal produces more talk, more visitors and more jumping on the bandwagon. As critic Robert Hughes says of New York collectors: Most of the times they buy what other people buy. They move in great schools, like bluefish, all identical. There is safety in numbers. If one wants Schnabel, they all want Schnabel, if one buys Keith Haring, two hundred Keith Härings will be sold.”
 
And the supreme attribute of branding and of the sign of the artist’s celebrity and recognition will be, within this context, the necessity to buy Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, or Jeff Koons, and so the denomination of the work of art and the positioning of the artist’s figure on the first place. The artistic success involves the strategic construction of the celebrity persona and the promotion as a brand simultaneously with the integration within the frame of the international circuit of the valorization of the work of art…
| full article

 
 
 

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Gok Fa – Waterbrush Chrysanthemum https://www.TattooConcierge.com/gok-fa-waterbrush-chrysanthemum/ Wed, 09 Aug 2017 03:52:47 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=45042   ‘Gok fa’ is the Cantonese term for the chrysanthemum flower which forms the inspiration of this piece. Fine black […]

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Chinese Gok Fa | Chrysanthemum Flower Watercolor With Strong Black Graphic Lines  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
‘Gok fa’ is the Cantonese term for the chrysanthemum flower which forms the inspiration of this piece. Fine black lines were utilized for the petal structure with free-flowing background watercolor accentuations. The dark circular bases add shape to the chrysanthemum and were first painted before being transferred onto the final artwork. Typically it is advisable to avoid only highlighting single muscle groups hence the asymmetrical extension of the paint brush movement onto the upper shoulder. Part of the TC classics and completed in a single session, it was again a true pleasure working with you on this composition

 
 
 

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Modern Primitive Movement https://www.TattooConcierge.com/modern-primitive-movement/ Tue, 08 Aug 2017 10:39:35 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=45012   Although what could be considered for many a marked departure from tattooing the concept of utilizing the human canvas […]

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Modern Primitive | Encyclopedia Of Body Modification And Tattooing History | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Although what could be considered for many a marked departure from tattooing the concept of utilizing the human canvas to convey stories and or emotions holds throughout. The more ‘extreme’ side of body/art was brought into Western public consciousness largely through the Modern Primitive movement. The latest encyclopedia entry offers a quick overview of this concept as well as a short history of its’ philosophy
 
| ‘The modern primitive’s movement was brought to mainstream awareness through the publication of Modern Primitives in 1989. The twelfth book in the RE/Search series by Vale and Juno, Modern Primitives looks at tattooing, piercing, and other body modification practices, and links those practices to those of primitive peoples
 
For many people who bought this book, it was the first time that they saw photos of a white man’s bifurcated penis, Ndebeli women wearing collars around their necks, an Indian sadhu with coconuts sewed to his body, and Fakir Musafar hanging from meat hooks driven into his flesh. While Musafar was already publicizing these practices for a limited audience through the publications Body Play and PFIQ, it wasn’t until Modern Primitives was published that extreme body modification was brought into the public consciousness
 
The term “modern primitives” was coined by Fakir Musafar, known as the father of the movement, and refers to people who modify their bodies in a ritualistic fashion, using symbols, philosophies, and practices borrowed from non-Western cultures in order to achieve not only physical but emotional transformation… | full article


 
 
 

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Woodblock Tsunami https://www.TattooConcierge.com/woodblock-tsunami/ Mon, 07 Aug 2017 08:47:15 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=44979   Inspired by traditional Japanese woodblock prints this half sleeve to shoulder composition implements abstract detailed alongside color-shading techniques in […]

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Tsuanmi | Japanese Woodblock Inspired Color Body Art | Modern Asian |  The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Inspired by traditional Japanese woodblock prints this half sleeve to shoulder composition implements abstract detailed alongside color-shading techniques in order to capture cresting of the waters’ movement. Spanning from comparatively simplified line work into rather complexly layered coloring, the incorporation of minimalist aesthetics highlighted with only portions of stronger coloration overall allows for lighter art. In place of the commonly utilized sunset here instead the bird silhouettes reflect natural sky tones. Forming part of the TC classics we will continue showcasing a wide variety of body/art styles

 
 
 
 

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Tattooing Mind Body And Spirit https://www.TattooConcierge.com/tattooing-mind-body-spirit/ Sat, 05 Aug 2017 05:22:49 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=44941   This peer-reviewed article from the Journal of Sociological Viewpoints initially explores a more eclectic variety of research behind the […]

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Tattooing - Mind Body And Spirit - The Inner Meaning Of The Art - Academic Viewpoints - Peer Reviewed Journal Publication | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
This peer-reviewed article from the Journal of Sociological Viewpoints initially explores a more eclectic variety of research behind the rationales and motivations of body/art appropriation, primarily from a Western viewpoint. Although the conclusion does not necessarily isolate any particular underlying universal, the piece itself raises a range of interesting considerations. The latest entry in the discussions section of the Guide further academic papers will be released shortly
 
| ‘In this fast paced, technological society where everybody is becoming a number, being tattooed is a way of remaining a person, something capable of feeling and expression. It is possibly another coping mechanism that helps an individual get along in the world as it is today. A person’s tattoo may look exactly like someone else’s, but the feeling and meaning of what it represents to each one of them is entirely different. No one or no thing can take that away from them, not even the worldly powers that control everything else in society.
 
Tattoos can represent or express anything the person wearing it wants it to without getting “permission” from society to do so. It is a freedom from the many societal restrictions. In the world of crisis today that is commanded by fear, one’s body is the only space that is sacred. The only true haven and refuge that one has is one’s inner self, one’s inner reality, and one’s inner essence. Tattooing is a way to bridge the gap between one’s inner reality and the outer reality of the world one must live in.
 
In conclusion, the reasons for getting a tattoo and the meaning behind what is visibly seen are as varied as the people involved. Whether a person gets a tattoo “just because he likes how it looks” or because it symbolizes something for them, the tattoo is a form of self-expression. The purpose of wearing this art on one’s body rather than hanging it on a wall signifies a total commitment to what it stands for. It is the most permanent form of self-expression, with no escape from it. It is everywhere they go, they carry it with them, and it is a part of them. It is connected to one’s mind and one’s body for their time spent here on earth, and connected to their spirit, their inner essence forever…
| full article

 
 
 

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Wild Horses https://www.TattooConcierge.com/wild-horses/ Mon, 31 Jul 2017 08:11:22 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=44692   Anatomically inspired structure of a horse figure crafted in fine line with soft watercolor accents. The shapes’ movement transitions […]

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Wild Horses Watercolor And Graphic Text - Thigh Body Art - The Tattoo Concierge - Global Platform | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Anatomically inspired structure of a horse figure crafted in fine line with soft watercolor accents. The shapes’ movement transitions concurrent aesthetics from multiple lines of graphic text. This photo was taken immediately following the application session and as such the area, particularly with the tighter skin on the upper thigh, is slightly swollen in places. There is a finer layering technique used throughout yet the ink must first settle before varying depths and shades are noticeable. The watercolor technique typically takes a full month to three before the shading elements become visible. Part of the TC classics, we will be posting more collaborations in this style over the coming months

 
 
 
 

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Military Tattooing History https://www.TattooConcierge.com/military-tattooing-history/ Sat, 29 Jul 2017 07:20:37 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=44526   A quick overview of the armed service’s influence on body/art in the latest encyclopedia entry. Due to their payment […]

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Military Tattooing History - The Body Art Encyclopedia | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A quick overview of the armed service’s influence on body/art in the latest encyclopedia entry. Due to their payment schedules, sailors and those in the Navy once constituted the best clientèle for a number of tattooists. Conversely, their frequency and breadth of travel aided the rising popularity of the art form particularly throughout the West. Apart from the imagery itself there exist certain codes and semantics with the inks’ placement on the body. Today a similar practice may be argued to extend across to the adoption of patriotic body/artwork, no longer confined strictly say to a ‘military’ classification
 
| ‘The rise of tattooing in the West can be directly traced to the influence of military men. Starting in the seventeenth century when English sailors were exploring the South Pacific, but possibly dating back to the colonization of the Americas and India, European sailors have picked up tattoos while traveling, bringing the tradition back to Europe, and later the United States, with them. It wasn’t until the late twentieth century that military men were no longer the biggest customers of American tattooists.
 
In the United States, times of war, from the Civil War through the Korean War, were always good times for tattooists. Military personnel flocked to tattooists to get tattoos that established their patriotism (through military insignias, battle commemorations, etc.) and which could remind them of their loved ones back home (“mom,” etc.). Consequently, most tattoo shops were located in port towns where sailors would not have to wander far to find one. Samuel O’ Reilly, a famed tattooist in New York City, once stated, “A Sailor without a tattoo is like a ship without grog: not seaworthy.” One of the great seaman-tattooists of all times was George Burchett-Davis who, in 1888 at the age of 16, shipped out on the H.M.S. Victory.
 
While sailors remained for many years the tattooist’s best customer, the Navy did not always look favorably on all tattoos, and in 1909 prohibited “indecent” tattoos for sailors. While this ruling was ignored for many years, in the 1940s, sporting a naked lady tattoo would be enough to be refused entry into the Navy. Many tattooists took advantage of this rule by advertising to cover up obscene tattoos, and many sailors returned to the Navy with their formerly naked ladies clothed as nurses, hula dancers, or “Indian squaws.”
 
The period between the two world wars saw tattooing at its most popular in the United States. It was at this time that tattooing had perhaps its highest level of social approval, due to its link with patriotism and Uncle Sam’s fighting boys. This nationalist fervor can also be seen in the numbers of citizens, military, and nonmilitary, who acquire patriotic tattoos during these times. The link between soldiers and sailors and tattooing was so strong that it was assumed that a man with tattoos was serving in the armed forces, or had been at one time.
 
The tattoos popular among the nation’s servicemen from the beginning of the twentieth century to the end of World War II comprise the system of traditional American tattooing which is both the most classic, and one of the most universally readable of all tattoo types… | full article


 
 

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Meso-American Body/Art https://www.TattooConcierge.com/meso-american-bodyart/ Sun, 25 Jun 2017 04:00:52 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42360   The latest encyclopedia entry is a concise historical overview of body/art practices across Meso-America. In a similar manner, following […]

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Meso American Tattooing - The Body Art Encyclopedia - Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
The latest encyclopedia entry is a concise historical overview of body/art practices across Meso-America. In a similar manner, following the arrival of Western explorers throughout the Polynesian Islands the introduction of European influence largely ceased a number of traditional regional procedures. Body modifications once conveying a very detailed symbolism alongside status ranking, Meso-American practices may comparatively seem more intense than a number of other indigenous art forms
 
| ‘Prior to the arrival of Columbus in Central America, Meso-America refers to a number of cultures found throughout central Mexico, southern Mexico, and along the Yucatan Peninsula, including the Olmec, the Teotihuacan culture, the Mayans, and the Aztecs, all of whom used a number of forms of body adornment and modification. The Olmec lived in the tropical lowlands of south-central Mexico from about 1200 BC to about 400 BC. The Mayan civilization thrived for almost three thousand years on the Yucatan Peninsula from about 1000 BC to AD 800. The Aztecs were primarily found in central Mexico and thrived from the fourteenth to the sixteenth centuries, until the arrival of the Spanish
 
When Hernándo Cortés and his Conquistadors arrived in Mexico in 1519, they were shocked to find that the natives of the area not only worshipped what the Spanish considered devils, but also marked these images onto their skin. Because the Spanish had never seen nor heard of tattooing, they considered the practice to be the work of the devil. The Aztecs, who the Spanish ultimately conquered, used tattooing to mark warriors, as both a sign of courage and also to commemorate his accomplishments. Early Aztec tattoos helped identify the rank of a warrior and the deeds he had accomplished. The tattoos may also have been thought to be important in guiding the dead to the afterworld
 
We know from archaeological evidence that ancient Meso-Americans pierced their ears, noses, and lower lips, and such practices continue to be popular amongst indigenous peoples in these regions… | full article


 
 

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Ink Brush Calf https://www.TattooConcierge.com/ink-brush-calf/ Sat, 24 Jun 2017 05:11:09 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42313   Abstract cherry blossom petals with the branches tailored from calligraphy brush movements. The vibrant, organic red sharply contrasting with […]

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Ink Brush Cherry Blossoms With Chinese Calligraphy - Color Body Art - Calf  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Abstract cherry blossom petals with the branches tailored from calligraphy brush movements. The vibrant, organic red sharply contrasting with the strong black Chinese calligraphy. Tailored to compliment the opposing calf’s sweeping line-work the composition adds a uniquely modern Asian aesthetic. Completed in just a single session, calves are often quite sensitive placements due to the areas’ comparative tightness of skin. This contemporary watercolor mixture with bold lettering, without being constrained within set dimensions to the body, works extremely well. Even when only certain portions of the full composition are visible each is able to ‘stand on its own’ as it were. Part of the TC classics we will be featuring a series of similar art/works over the coming months

 
 
 

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Sky High https://www.TattooConcierge.com/sky-high/ Fri, 23 Jun 2017 02:56:50 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42270   Vibrantly colored, fine-detail old propeller airplane tattoo artwork streaming down through the clouds. Although a much smaller style of […]

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e Streaming Down From The Clouds - Colored Fine Detail Body/Art | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Vibrantly colored, fine-detail old propeller airplane tattoo artwork streaming down through the clouds. Although a much smaller style of composition this cute TC classic still plays with abstract shading and depth using soft brushed aesthetics. In a much more subtle, perhaps gentle variation of the ‘skin-rip’ concept here flesh toned watercolor pigment is utilized to create an emerging effect. Spacing with varied ink placement are essentially as close as one should be comfortable in body/art considering the canvases’ dynamic movement over the years

 
 
 
 

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Marshallese Tattooing https://www.TattooConcierge.com/marshallese-tattooing/ Thu, 22 Jun 2017 04:54:46 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42243   Marshellese tattooing was once believed to be a ‘gift from god’ with women often receiving more artwork than men. […]

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Marshall Islands - The Body Art Encyclopedia - Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Marshellese tattooing was once believed to be a ‘gift from god’ with women often receiving more artwork than men. Due to both ink as well as scarifications strong spiritual associations, following discovery of the islands by explorers and then missionary groups, this form of body/art was subsequently reclassified as a ‘heathen’ undertaking. Western influence changing public perceptions into ultimately an actively banned practice so as to impose de jure standards of modern aesthetic beauty. The latest encyclopedia entry offers an insight to a fascinating appearance of body/art which has today all but ceased
 
| ‘As with other Pacific Island tattoos, Marshallese tattoos were linked to status and rank, with chiefs being the only members of society to receive head and neck tattoos, which consisted of black horizontal bands running around the neck to the hairline, with tight vertical lines that run in a narrow band from the eyes to the jaw. Chiefs also exclusively wore the penis tattoo
 
Tattoos also indicated rank in the sense that the tattoo needed to be paid for, both in gifts to the gods, from whom the tattoo was seen to come, as well as for the tattooist. Wealthier individuals could therefore afford more elaborate tattoos. Tattoos also served a protective function, and were used to beautify both men and women. In addition, as in many other cultures, tattooing especially for men was seen as a rite of passage, marking his initiation into manhood, as well as a test of his strength and endurance
 
Tattoo motifs were abstract, as in many of the Pacific Islands, with lines serving as the primary design element. Because fishing was the major form of subsistence, and much of Marshallese culture revolved around sea travel and the exploitation of marine life, oceanic elements such as fish, shark’s teeth, and shells, as well as canoe parts, were also represented symbolically in tattoos. It was said that because fish have stripes, humans should have stripes, linking even the omnipresent lines to fish. Jewelry, too, was derived from the sea and included armbands and necklaces made of shells, fish teeth, and the feathers of sea birds
 
For the purpose of tattooing, men’s bodies are broken into a number of zones, as we saw with Marquesan and Maori tattooing, and those zones are subdivided into a number of smaller zones. Each zone, such as the upper chest, stomach, or shoulder, would be tattooed with a different design. The entire torso, front and back, could be tattooed, as well as the arms and, less frequently, the legs, and many men were almost completely covered with tattoos, which from afar, looked to observers like a suit of chain mail…
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Natures Pastiche https://www.TattooConcierge.com/natures-pastiche/ Wed, 21 Jun 2017 07:42:37 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42143   Series of natural elements compiled into a raven’s silhouette. This upper shoulder body/art draws on sharply lined fine elements […]

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Natures Pastiche - Detailed Upper Back Feminine Body Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Series of natural elements compiled into a raven’s silhouette. This upper shoulder body/art draws on sharply lined fine elements as well as negative space to create what appears as sheens on the wing feathers. Although somewhat harder to discern from a distance, there are also tree branches as well as a frog merged into the body shape. Completed over two shorter application sessions this is part of the TC classics collection. The eclectic amalgamation principle has been used within multiple schools, it’s always a pleasure to see the highly abstract visualizations of a clients’ unique concept

 
 
 

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Marquesas Tattooing History https://www.TattooConcierge.com/marquesas-tattooing-history/ Sat, 17 Jun 2017 07:15:17 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42130   A brief insight into tattooing traditions across the Marquesas islands. Highly structured, conveying deeply layered sets of meanings as […]

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Marquesas - The Encyclopedia - Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A brief insight into tattooing traditions across the Marquesas islands. Highly structured, conveying deeply layered sets of meanings as well as reflections of ones’ socio-economic status it is said that no two compositions within this aesthetic are exactly alike. With the application tools broadly similar to those used across the region, Marquesas is held to have significantly impacted Western tattooing alongside the art forms popularization
 
| ‘The Marquesas Islands are a group of Polynesian islands originally settled by Samoans between the first and fourth centuries. Like many other Polynesian islands, the Marquesas are known for their tattoo traditions, which were most likely brought to the islands by the first inhabitants. First explored in the late sixteenth century by Spanish navigator Álvaro de Menda ˜na de Neira, and later visited by Captain Cook in 1774, the islands were later claimed by France in the nineteenth century. Cook’s visit, and his reports of tattooing traditions, were significant in that they played a major role in the exposure of Polynesian tattooing to the Western world, and also in the change and destruction of those same practices
 
As with other Polynesian tattoo traditions, Marquesan tattooing was used to mark important features connected with status, wealth, and gender, but unlike other islands, the tradition was not restricted to chiefs and their families. Tattoos marked one’s affiliation with any number of groups such as warriors, graded associations, or entertainers called ka’ioi, as well as his genealogical position. Because the tattoo recipient had to pay for the tattoo, wearing a tattoo demonstrated one’s wealth, and for men, the ability to withstand pain. For women, tattoos were a sign of beauty, and for men and women they also served other purposes such as protection against evil and the marking of important events, and receiving a tattoo was a rite of passage for young men and women. Tattoos ultimately represented both individual and group identity, and allowed for the participation in important social and religious rituals
 
Tattoo tools were similar to those on other Pacific islands, and included the primary tools, made out of wood, with sharpened bone combs of different widths protruding from the end. This tool would be tapped into the skin after being dipped into ink by a mallet, inserting the ink into the skin….
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Drawing On Popular Culture https://www.TattooConcierge.com/drawing-popular-culture/ Fri, 16 Jun 2017 08:32:36 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42106   Using tattooing to introduce biology, the concept borrows on tattoo arts’ mainstream recognition to entice students. In short, an […]

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Biology And Tattooing- Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Using tattooing to introduce biology, the concept borrows on tattoo arts’ mainstream recognition to entice students. In short, an embedding of scientific knowledge within an immediately relevant topic. Despite comparatively technical terminology the article details considerations that should ideally be further understood by artists and clients alike. The latest entry in the academic discussions sections, large expansions are planned for the guide over the coming months

 
| ‘Because tattoos are applied to the skin, the process turns skin anatomy into a teaching moment. Two mutually dependent layers make up the skin: the epidermis and the dermis. There are four anatomical layers (called strata) of epidermis on the human body; they are derived from the ectoderm. From the most superficial to the deepest, those layers are called the stratum corneum (20-30 cell layers thick), stratum granulosum (3-5 cell layers thick), stratum spinosum (5-10 cell layers thick), and stratum basale (1 cell layer thick). Cells at the surface are dead, whereas the deeper layers closer to the dermis are living cells. At areas of high friction (feet and palms of the hands), an extra layer called the stratum lucidum is between the stratum granulosum and the stratum spinosum. Dermis rests on the subcutaneous fatty layer called the panniculus adiposus. The area that adheres the epidermis to the dermis is referred to as the dermoepidermal junction and has two layers; the lamina lucida connects to the epidermis, and the lamina densa connects to the dermis. Dermis is derived from the mesoderm, and its main function is to sustain and support the epidermis
 
To apply a tattoo, the artist pulls the skin tight and adjusts the rate at which the needle delivers ink to ensure that a sufficient force is supplied to the needle, which is a function of the client’s body fat ratio and the chosen area for the tattoo application (professional tatto artist Michael Adkins, pers. comm.). A solid needle injects ink pigments as a suspension into the skin dermis approximately 1-4 mm deep. The process destroys the four layers of epidermis, the layer between the epidermis and dermis, and the first layer of dermis as the needle penetrates the skin to deliver the ink. Skin can vary, depending on its anatomic location and the sex and age of the individual. Skin thickness depends on dermal, not epidermal, thickness. Because epidermis does not contain blood vessels, bleeding occurs only when the artist has punctured down into the dermal region (at least) with the needle
 
After ink delivery, granulation tissue forms, trapping the dye in fibroblasts in the superficial dermis. The ability to properly apply a tattoo is related to the experience of the artist. If the ink is not applied to the correct skin layer, the body will shed the tattoo as the epidermis is naturally shed. The initial vibrancy of a tattoo fades quickly because only a portion of the ink stays in the dermis; an unknown fraction of pigment is moved by the lymphatic system. When tattoos are applied to hands and feet, color or vibrancy fades faster because the tattoo is applied below one more skin layer. Because tattooing involves both the homogenization of the epidermal surface and the implantation of foreign ink in the dermal layer, cellular death occurs and results in a scabbing process…
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Watercolor Animal Portrait https://www.TattooConcierge.com/watercolor-animal-portrait/ Tue, 13 Jun 2017 03:00:14 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=42079   Playing with levels of abstraction as well as much softer watercolor brush movements, this ‘best friend’ dedication was captured […]

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Remembering A Best Friend - Soft Watercolor Dog Portrait Upper Torso Body Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Playing with levels of abstraction as well as much softer watercolor brush movements, this ‘best friend’ dedication was captured on the clients’ upper shoulder with additional extensions across the back already planned. Although based on photos, artwork was painted prior to the session with pictures then used as primary references during the re-creation on skin. More muted and skin color tones compliment the dogs ears smoothly fading out rather than created as hard-edged. Typically we would recommend designing any composition to utilize at least a a half-back if touching any portion of the area yet, in this case, its’ open aesthetics match. Forming part of the TC classics this piece will be displayed in the galleries shortly

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Dotwork Ink Splash https://www.TattooConcierge.com/dotwork-ink-splash/ Mon, 12 Jun 2017 03:27:24 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41958   Crafted as an abstract, asymmetrical yet complimentary pair – the client’s left torso composition features geometric dot-work surrounded by […]

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Abstract Geometric Shapes And Splatter - Side Torso - The Tattoo Concierge - For Those Defining The Body Art Industry | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Crafted as an abstract, asymmetrical yet complimentary pair – the client’s left torso composition features geometric dot-work surrounded by thicker ink brush painting. Free form watercolor elegantly contrasting rigid two-tone shapes within. This piece somewhat echoes the previously posted Polynesian tribal variation yet adds a layer of organic movement using unstructured bordering lines. Forming part of the TC classics, we look forward to showcasing similar aesthetics shortly

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Magic And The Occult https://www.TattooConcierge.com/magic-and-the-occult/ Sun, 11 Jun 2017 05:01:01 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41949   From personal visualizations of subjective realities to warding off evil spirits, tattooing has long held magical associations throughout a […]

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Magic And Occult Tattoo Culture - Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
From personal visualizations of subjective realities to warding off evil spirits, tattooing has long held magical associations throughout a range of cultures across the globe. In the latest encyclopedia entry a short insight into the artworks use for these functions is introduced with Thailand and Sak Yant body/art being perhaps the most well known modern day enactment
 
| ‘Tattooing has long been associated with the magical practices of a number of people. In many traditions, the use of magic words or magical symbols is said to have the power to command spirits or to enact change. These symbols can magically take on a physical quality of the phenomenon or object that they represent. Thus by tattooing magical symbols or words onto the body, practitioners hoped to be able to make something occur in life.
 
The practice of tattooing (or writing) magical symbols and words was common in Medieval Europe among occult practioners and lasted through the seventeenth century, when the tattooing of astrological symbols was common. This type of magic was seen as particularly useful because when it’s difficult to get the rare ingredients needed for some magical spells, one can use the symbol of the ingredient or the symbol of the corresponding planet, and mark it on the body. At the same time, European pilgrims were traveling to the Holy Land to pick up Christian tattoos, themselves seen as both souvenirs and magical forms of protection. European sailors, too, practiced magical tattooing, wearing certain tattoos for protection. For instance, a pig on one foot and a rooster on the other acted as a charm that would keep a man from drowning at sea and the words “hold” and “fast” could be tattooed onto the knuckles of the hand to help the seaman to better hold the ship’s riggings. Propellers on the buttocks would also “propel” the wearer to shore. British sailors also hoped that wearing a scene of the crucifixion of Jesus on their backs would either elicit sympathy during a whipping, or perhaps may protect them from undue pain. Coptic Christians often tattooed a cross on their foreheads, as both a sign of devotion and also to protect themselves from evil spirits.
 
Other cultures use tattooing for magical purposes as well. Burmese tattooists create love charms in the form of tattoos made with magical ink, and tattoo parrots on the shoulder for good luck. Tibetans use tattooing for magical and medicinal purposes, tattooing mantras to achieve inner harmony and tattooing acupuncture points with herbal dyes, and Hindus tattoo certain gods onto the body to relieve pain. Perhaps the culture with the best-known tradition of magical tattooing is Thailand….
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Anatomical Abstractions https://www.TattooConcierge.com/anatomical-abstractions/ Sat, 10 Jun 2017 06:59:47 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41940   Delicate fine-line, black ink tattoo art merged with text as well as abstract elements. Playing off the genuine anatomical […]

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Anatomical Birds In Flight - Upper Shoulder Tattoo - The Tattoo Concierge - For Those Defining The Body Art Industry | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Delicate fine-line, black ink tattoo art merged with text as well as abstract elements. Playing off the genuine anatomical structure of the scapula, sometimes referred to as the shoulder-blade or wing-bone, the artwork also incorporates silhouetted birds flying out from the upper portion. Completed in a single session, placement with the body took on a far more significant role than other styles. Forming part of the TC classics gallery, a variety of eclectic aesthetics will be posted over the coming months

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Secret Ink – Modern American Tattoo Culture https://www.TattooConcierge.com/secret-ink/ Wed, 07 Jun 2017 02:32:26 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41736   ‘On the one side, researchers portray tattoos negatively by focusing on deviance and mental disorders. On the other, scholars […]

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American Tattoo Culture - Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
‘On the one side, researchers portray tattoos negatively by focusing on deviance and mental disorders. On the other, scholars view tattoos as positively contributing to identity formation and fashion‘ | The latest peer-reviewed journal entry from The Journal of American Culture offers an interesting overview of contemporary tattooing culture in the United States. Outlining a widening divide between varied rationales fueling participation whilst prejudice against all seemingly continuing to deepen. Like numerous facets of modern American culture even widespread usage and or popular adoption does not preclude broader negative, societal-level stereotypes
 
| ‘The expanding popularity of tattoos seems to be based on the fact that these can serve various purposes for different individuals. Some use them as a fashion tool whereas others use them as a method of identity formation, such as commemorating a lost loved one or representing one’s neighborhood. At the same time, society condemns tattooees for their permanent markings based on the idea that only deviants would do such a thing. Successful musicians, actors and athletes are regularly seen with visible tattoos and inspire many young tattooees to join the ranks of the tattooed. Yet while younger tattooees increasingly find tattoos normative, tattoos are in limbo – neither fully damned nor fully lauded. DeMeIIo has argued that those promoting tattoos have won the cultural battle and gained tattoo’s acceptance in the mainstream culture, but tattoo clients remain concerned about cultural rejection. The seemingly contradictory situation in which tattoos are both mainstream and unacceptable contributes to clients’ impression management. In an attempt to fill the gap of qualitative analysis in tattoo research, this article has discussed the willingness of clients go to great lengths, including severe pain, to maintain a presentation of the self that is acceptable to society’s powerful members…
 
What seems to be a contradiction at the societal level sometimes reveals itself to be hypocrisy at the individual level. The fact that millions of Americans continue to get tattooed has led some scholars to suggest tattoos are now mainstream. Yet, as argued above, the accounts of participants who were in the process of getting tattoos indicate tattoos are not wholly accepted. As more and more people choose to express themselves through ink, the dermatological processes meant to maintain one’s “dark secret” will become increasingly harmful to tattooees and, in turn, the society at large. Should tattoos fail to gain full cultural acceptance, millions of Americans will be fated to live a life of “a special kind of alienation from self”
 
Were tattoos just another youthful fad that parents and elders disapproved of, discrimination against tattooees would not be as pressing an issue. However, tattoos are more than a typical fad: “Even if the meanings of tattoos shift, and their present cultural currency declines or exhausts, most tattooed bodies will bear this ironic fad for the course of the life cycle”. According to Kosut, over half of all adolescents have seriously considered getting a tattoo. There is a bleak future for today’s youth should they get tattooed only to enter a workforce where two in five adults think simply having a tattoo justifies being denied employment, including nearly half of all people holding supervisory roles. The combination of more highly skilled and highly educated Americans getting tattoos with increasing discrimination against tattooees is setting the table for a cultural clash wherein highly productive members are forever disqualified based solely on pigmentation…
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Playful Leopards https://www.TattooConcierge.com/playful-leopards/ Sat, 03 Jun 2017 06:57:27 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41704   Pair of playful leopards effortlessly wrapping around the inner to lower arm. Created in a fine line aesthetic, the […]

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Two Playful Leopards - Forearm Dotwork And Fine Line Body Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Pair of playful leopards effortlessly wrapping around the inner to lower arm. Created in a fine line aesthetic, the work follows more of a stencil approach within tattooing. The broad use of negative space not only implies movement yet allows the composition to remain a very delicate piece. Such graphic tattoos require significant empty space around and no other additions were planned. Completed in one short session this is part of the TC classics gallery

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Tattoos In The Analytical Process https://www.TattooConcierge.com/tattoos-analytical-process/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 05:10:39 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41553   A quite lengthy, in-depth analysis including professional case studies around the psychological motivations behind tattooing from the International Journal […]

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Inuit-Facial-Tattoos-Compass-Cultura - Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A quite lengthy, in-depth analysis including professional case studies around the psychological motivations behind tattooing from the International Journal of Psychoanalysis. Although absolutely a contentious issue whenever postulating any ‘one’ or even primary theory for the practice, the paper offers a well thought-out viewpoint as to the visual manifestation of the internal world (which body/art itself is often held to represent). Regardless of whether the summary is accepted, it offers a deeply rooted rationale for one possible approach
 
| ‘…What we can safely ascertain is that tattooing constitutes an unconscious visual projection of the situation present in the analytic process, expressing in the transference crucial internal conflicts: in Walter Benjamin’s words, “image is that wherein what has been comes together in a flash with the now to form a constellation.” The tattoo is something of a dialectic snapshot of the state of maternal and paternal relationships, desires for intimacy and distance, commonality and difference, identification and individuation in ‘dialectics at a standstill’ as Benjamin (1999, p. 1088) so famously described the dynamics of images in his Arcades Project. What appears most significant for the visual image of the tattoo is the need for stasis and immutability, as if the standstill produces a degree of stability. This inner stability is threatened by the unconscious fear of potential violation of a taboo which renders abandonment and fusion anxieties unbearable. Tattooing thus represents a marginally successful attempt to create a transitional object by conjoining the actual manipulation of the skin with the symbolic creation of an image. The effort is akin to patching up holes in the transitional space in the attempt to reconstruct it.
 
Even though the primary distinguishing characteristic of the tattoo rests in the conscious awareness of its function as an expression of individuality, we have also seen that it simultaneously strives to bring about the exact opposite, that is, to enlist the visual image as a way of establishing identification in emulation of and in relation to the targeted objects. It is a veiled expression of individuality in the form of a fashion statement. This invites us to cautious speculation about whether the popularity of tattooing results from the fact that it is fashionable, or whether it is fashionable precisely because it is often the manifestation of a psychodynamic constellation…
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Japanese Tattooing History https://www.TattooConcierge.com/japanese-tattooing-history/ Wed, 31 May 2017 07:25:13 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41463   Interestingly it is recorded that Western adoption of Japanese tattooing aesthetics fueled a resurgence of the practice in Japan. […]

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Japanese Body Art - Tattoo Art And Education Guide - Historical Library | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Interestingly it is recorded that Western adoption of Japanese tattooing aesthetics fueled a resurgence of the practice in Japan. Long since classified as being confined to the ‘outlaw’ or criminal elements particularly in Asia, American tattooing styles with their wide spread popularity conversely allowed for a comparatively recent broader adoption of the art form across Japan. The latest entry in the body/art encyclopedia offers a concise summary of Japan’s tattooing traditions
 
| ‘Not only is Japanese tattooing known to be one of the most sophisticated in terms of imagery, style, and technique in the world, but it is one of the oldest tattooing traditions in the world as well, dating back to the hunter-gatherers of the Jomon period (10,000 BC–300 BC). Archeologists have found clay human figures called dogu that have marks around the eyes, cheeks, forehead, and lips that may indicate tattooing, which was being practiced in other cultures during this period as well. In addition, the women of the Ainu, an ethnic group living on an island at the northernmost end of Japan, have worn upper lip tattoos for hundreds and perhaps thousands of years. Tattoos were worn as well by farmers in the Yayoi period (300 BC–AD 300), the period that saw the emergence of Japanese culture, as a marker of status, like many Polynesian cultures. In addition, the tattoos used religious symbols to ward off evil spirits. Again, clay figurines from the period show facial tattoos. As in other stratified societies, such as in the Greco-Roman world, tattoos in the Kofun period (AD 300–600), during which modern Japanese political organizations emerged, became associated with criminality and were used not only to punish and identify criminals (often with the mark of their specific crime) but to identify untouchable classes as well. Chinese attitudes that associated tattooing with barbarism helped to further stigmatize tattoos during this period, given that China governed the region at this time. On the other hand, punitive tattooing may also be linked to the origins of decorative tattooing because, as in other states in which tattoos were used punitively, members of the underclass often modified those tattoos in order to disguise the original meanings, perhaps creating decorative markings in the process.
 
It wasn’t until the late Edo period (1804–1868), however, that what we know of as modern decorative tattooing, or horimono, developed in Edo (now Tokyo), which was experiencing a cultural revolution of sorts. Prior to this time, lovers, courtesans, and prostitutes would often have the name of a lover written on the upper part of the arm, with the kanji or character for inochi (life), symbolizing a pledge of eternal love, added. These pledge tattoos probably derived from earlier “love dots” or small moles tattooed on the hand. But the major influence on the development of the sophisticated Japanese tattoo form were the wood-block print, or ukiyo-e, artists whose colorful and complex designs would later be seen in tattoos. The most important of the ukiyo-artists in terms of the development of tattooing in Japan was Kuniyoshi, whose 1827 illustrations of the Suikoden, a Chinese novel translated into Japanese, included heavily tattooed warriors with mythical heroes,legendary battle scenes, and animals like koi, dragons, and tigers tattooed on their bodies. These images were surrounded by highly stylized waves, wind, and flowers, including cherry blossoms, chrysanthemums, and peonies. The pictures from this novel, and from the wood-block prints of nineteenth-century Ukiyo-e artists like Hokusai and Yoshitoshi, came to form the iconographic vocabulary for modern Japanese tattooing….
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Delicate Watercolor In Flight https://www.TattooConcierge.com/delicate-watercolor-flight/ Tue, 30 May 2017 05:16:18 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41418   Following the movement along the clavicle, negative space from the birds’ wings and tail feathers gently compliment empty portions […]

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Watercolor Painted Bird In Flight - Detailed Brush Work And Color V | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Following the movement along the clavicle, negative space from the birds’ wings and tail feathers gently compliment empty portions of her upper torso. Rather than placement squarely in-line with the shoulder, as is most common, flight of the artwork is further implied due to the slightly lowered positioning. The outline or structure of the bird has been crafted using thicker fine line elements so as to balance the detailed, light watercolor shading within. Completed over an afternoon session and part of the TC classics collection, this was her first piece of body art. As the discomfort throughout tattooing is directly proportionate to the thickness of skin (not considering the skill of the artist too of course), although the shoulder areas are typically not overly sensitive, it may often feel tighter and sharper when working towards the chest. Due to numerous requests further examples of these mixed-water brush aesthetics will be posted over the coming months

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Body Art In India https://www.TattooConcierge.com/body-art-in-india/ Sun, 28 May 2017 06:30:05 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41381   A brief overview of the wide range of body/art practices on the subcontinent, exploring more popularized appearances as well […]

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India - Body Modification Encyclopedia - The Tattoo Art And Education Guide | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A brief overview of the wide range of body/art practices on the subcontinent, exploring more popularized appearances as well as highly specific regional adaptations. The latest entry in the encyclopedia, we are always excited to post articles covering the breadth and scope of body/art’s use around the globe
 
| ‘Tattooing, piercing, and the use of henna are widely practiced on the Indian subcontinent, among tribal peoples as well as among caste Hindus. Women in India have practiced tattooing since at least the fifteenth century and probably before. Indigenous tribal groups use tattoos to mark tribal identity, individual identity, marriageability, and sometimes ritual status. Designs include symmetrical patterns, birds, and animals, and tattooing was also seen as a purely decorative practice, used to beautify the individual. Men sometimes wore tattoos as well, but this is far more common today than it was in the past. Among the Mers, for example, girls are tattooed starting at seven or eight, starting with their forearms and hands. Later, their feet, calves, neck, and chest are tattooed. Dots and lines are used to create gods, animals, domestic images, and plants. Among the Naga of Northeast India, women were tattooed on the back of the knee if they were married, and men wore facial tattoos that demonstrated their achievements in warfare and headhunting.
 
Tattoos are also used by some caste Hindus; this probably derives from Hinduism as both Krishna and Vishnu wore tattoos, and one theory explains women’s facial tattoos as a way of identifying women who were captured by Muslims in the Middle Ages. Hindus also saw tattoos as evidence of earthly suffering, so wearing a tattoo could act as penance for one’s sins and get one entry into heaven. The Bhils, on the other hand, saw tattoos as evidence of good deeds that also could ease entry into the afterworld. Women in the Gujarat region see the tattoo as the only items that stay on her body after her death, so her tattoos are used to identify her in heaven. Finally, Christian Indians had birds tattooed on their arms and thighs as symbols of the Holy Ghost. In any case, tattoos for Hindus were certainly used to mark status, especially for women. Forehead tattoos were common, and higher caste women had fewer tattoos. Also, tattoos implied chastity and fidelity for a woman, and most women were tattooed prior to marriage, since tattoos were often a sign that she was marriageable. Traditionally, tattoos were created on women by women, using three needles, wrapped together, and dipped in ink, and primarily utilized abstract designs. While they were not applied in a ritual context, they still were seen as an important rite of passage for a woman. Today, however, some men, often from the Waghari tribe, work as itinerant tattooists, traveling around the country tattooing at festivals and markets with an electric machine, and sheets of Indian flash with peacocks, gods, flowers, watches, and other local symbols….
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Worlds First Body/Art Concierge https://www.TattooConcierge.com/worlds-first-body-art-concierge/ Tue, 23 May 2017 05:51:56 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41337   | describe the key events & opportunities that led to your founding | When starting I simply wished to […]

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Trophy Of Excellence - The Tattoo Concierge - Most Valuable Service Awards 2017  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
| describe the key events & opportunities that led to your founding |

When starting I simply wished to offer a greater level of service and care than what was available across the industry to a single studio’s clientèle. ‘Walk-in’ studios were famous for what may only be politely described as having a somewhat discourteous attitude towards communication. It seemed to me that the type of interaction people came to expect from a ‘tattoo studio’ would largely influence or indeed dictate how both sides approached commissions, to the extent of affecting the quality of the art produced. This constituted a huge portion of the process that was not being addressed, one that inherently limits the scope for the artist as well as the collector
 
Many people still view tattooing as something rebellious, underground and or entirely separate from the traditional art world. Broadly speaking it can be common for many to spend more time researching and paying higher prices on a new jacket or a pair of shoes than they do for their body/art – yet only the latter will most likely be with them for life. This kind of segmentation and stereotyping is becoming less commonplace though. The majority of our clients are high-powered executives, CEO’s, artists and true professionals from all walks of life. And in this respect I have always held that body/art commissions differentiate themselves in both importance and lifespan from almost every other market or service. Such permanent commissions involve the development of highly particular, permanent artworks that may be all too frequently rushed into or not fully considered. I see the development of our Body/Art Concierge as contributing to the alteration of perceptions around the practice. Adding a measured evaluation to something that frequently involves ownership of art for a lifespan far exceeding that of even say a traditional canvas. Furthermore the centralization of consulting services, management, scheduling, education and payment processing permits an increased authority that has typically not been associated with individual artists or studios
 
| how has the greater China market for your industry grown and how has your company responded
|

I would estimate that on any given week we speak with clients from over 40 countries around the world. For the Mainland China market specifically we are finding not only a larger number of art collectors looking to utilize a different ‘canvas’ yet also a group of overseas executives stationed in say Shanghai, Beijing or top tier cities that take advantage of their comparative proximity. Yet as bookings are frequently made years in advance the segmentation would not necessarily be geographic, pertaining instead to a shared patience and dedication more than anything else
 
 
News Coverage | Trophy Of Excellence - The Tattoo Concierge - Most Valuable Service Awards 2017  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
| what niche does your company fill to differentiate itself from others |

I believe it could be most succinctly summarized as the Worlds’ First Body Art Concierge. Just as boutique hotels, private banks or personal trainers assist in the tailored development of individual desires – we see ourselves as the liaisons between genuine body artists and collectors. This entails a delicate balance of having a conscientious understanding of highly unique aesthetic preferences against measured possibilities and technical limitations around translating these into ‘unique living art’. Essentially the service involves mutually defining what are frequently highly emotive, abstract concepts and then assisting with their translation into reality, i.e. the creation of art
 

| how does your company offer more value than its competitors |

The Concierge service requires a very select set of skills that are not often associated with any ‘standard’ mainstream position. Furthermore there must exist an understanding of art, psychology, interpersonal communication as well as the rich technical possibilities around physiology within application. We are the first concierge of its kind yet I would say personal, objective professional guidance surrounding genuine body/art is the value not currently provided elsewhere
 
 
Trophy Of Excellence - The Tattoo Concierge - Most Valuable Service Awards 2017 | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
| what obstacles have you faced in HK, how have you overcome them |

Any obstacles have primarily revolved around education as well as patience in answering questions or addressing the most common, historically associated prejudices. We schedule personal consults and phone people directly, regardless of where they are in the world, to answer their questions as well as advise on possible approaches or interpretations of concepts. Apart from direct discussions around individual works I built the on line ‘Body Art Guide’. This contains hundreds of academic articles as well as an eclectic range of insights into the practices’ transition across almost all cultures over the ages. I released the ‘Masterpiece Reference Library’ which contains over 200,000 different art works alongside making all ‘flash’ and common tattoo pieces freely available in an effort to show that inspiration for body art can be drawn from any source, not just templates or what has traditionally been done. We further have outreach programs with international schools and routinely participate in a number of university studies. Such campaigns must be performed in a measured and consistent manner. Throughout all media interviews and filming we attempt to concentrate on the practice itself rather than individual ‘celebrity’ clients, trends, top-tips or the usual somewhat surface level discussions so commonly publicized
 
| what plans do you have for expansion and growth in the region |

At this stage we are looking for a more global expansion with a select group. As the majority of clientèle already fly in from overseas rather than continuing this unidirectional flow we are aiming to bring the service to their neighborhood. While it will remain necessary for most to travel in order to work with their ideal artist, there are no longer limitations around ensuring a stable quality of service when working with a plethora of unique masters of the craft
 
| what is the secret of your success |

That’s very kind of you to classify the work up to this stage as a success yet I see it as simply the first steps. I’ll let you know when I classify it as a success!

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Geometrically Tribal https://www.TattooConcierge.com/geometrically-tribal/ Mon, 22 May 2017 07:40:50 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41324   Following heavily Polynesian inspired curvatures with the muscles, more fine-line geometric pattern work has been utilized throughout the center […]

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Detailed Intricate Tribal Pattern And Geometric Work - Upper Torso Body Art | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Following heavily Polynesian inspired curvatures with the muscles, more fine-line geometric pattern work has been utilized throughout the center as opposed to the commonly used solid-black shading. This juxtaposition is quite a novel interpretation on the traditional solid tribal colorings and one that is, surprisingly, not widely implemented. The art/work was completed over multiple sessions due to the intricacy and color accents in detailing. The piece extends over the upper back, another photo showing a second angle will be posted shortly

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Body Modification Regulations https://www.TattooConcierge.com/body-modification-regulations/ Sun, 21 May 2017 05:30:12 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41305   A heavily Western based (i.e. United States) more scientific overview of the practicalities for health and hygiene throughout a […]

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Tattooing Regulations - Body Art Journals - Unique Tattoo Artwork | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A heavily Western based (i.e. United States) more scientific overview of the practicalities for health and hygiene throughout a range of body modification procedures, the legislation and protocols covered will most likely significantly resemble those to be adopted or already enacted in numerous countries around the world
 
| ‘Tattooing and body piercing are flourishing, and the new innovations of branding and scarification continue to develop. Even more evident is the advent of cosmetic tattooing, advertised boldly in the newspapers and phone books as permanent makeup for a beautiful personal investment. While no national databases are available to provide an accurate picture of body art recipients, findings from several small, recent studies are consistent. They include published rates of 19 to 23 percent for tattooing among young adults 18 to 25 years of age and rates of 33 percent for body piercing. A recent Ohio University poll found that about one of every seven adults was tattooed, with young adults (18 to 34 years of age) 10 times more likely to have the decorative designs.
 
Another way to look at the presence of body art is to examine the number of studios in a state; the figures then become phenomenal. In Texas, with a population of 21 million people, almost 900 tattooing studios were registered in the state as of January 2004, with over half that number listed as beauty salons or spas performing cosmetic tattooing. Of the 599 body-piercing studios registered in Texas, approximately 300 combine both tattooing and body piercing. If one estimated that body-piercing studios average five piercings weekly, then over 155,000 yearly would be produced in just one state; the number of tattoos would be over 234,000. Body art is an invasive procedure: For body piercing, jewelry is inserted into a tract; for tattooing, non-FDA-approved pigment is introduced into the skin by multiple punctures to produce indelible designs; and for permanent cosmetics, pigment is inserted into the eyelids, eyebrows, and lips. Branding is a specific method of scarification resulting in a deliberate keloid formation. In each procedure, there is a release of serosanguinous fluid “accompanying the repetitive puncturing of tattooing, the puncture wounds of body piercing, and the application of heated steel,” predisposing the patron to local infections and systemic illness such as bloodborne diseases.
 
The public may assume that state regulations exist for body art, with regular inspections protecting the client, and that if there are problems with a studio, the state will automatically close it. Often it is not until a body art complication occurs and is reported to state health officials that the public begins to realize just how strong or weak these statutes can be for client safety. In reality, it may take over two years for the due-process procedures to work before a studio is shut down, if it even happens…
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Hawaiian Tattooing https://www.TattooConcierge.com/hawaiian-tattooing/ Sat, 20 May 2017 04:50:13 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41288   Although part of the Polynesian traditions, the Hawaiian chiefs did not have the same facial tattooing practices as those […]

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Hawaii | The Body Art Education Guide | Tattooing Encyclopedia | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists' Choice
 
Although part of the Polynesian traditions, the Hawaiian chiefs did not have the same facial tattooing practices as those in New Zealand. The latest entry exploring the varied traditional tattooing practices across Hawaii as well as some foundations of popular aesthetic appropriation
 
| ‘The islands were most likely populated by people from the Marquesan Islands some time between AD 800 and 1000, who most likely brought their tattooing traditions with them. First visited by Captain James Cook in 1778, he named the islands the Sandwich Islands in honor of one of his expedition sponsors. The Hawaiian word for tattoo, kakau i ka uhi, means to “strike on the black,” which explains how it is done. Hawaiian tattooing as it was practiced in Cook’s time was done by dipping a prepared tattooing implement—a comb made of sharpened bones or teeth, connected to a turtle-shell or seashell and hafted to a handle—into a black dye. The tattoo artist placed the instrument on the skin, striking it with a mallet or other hammer-like implement. The dye used for tattooing was derived from the burnt remains of the kukui nut mixed with sugarcane juice
 
Hawaiian tattoos, at the time of Cook’s first visit, were primarily made up of lines, stars, cross-hatching, triangles, chevrons, arches, checkerboard patterns, and lizards. Tattoos probably served as protective devices for warriors, in that warriors’ and chiefly tattoos were worn on the front of the body, the spear throwing arm, the legs, and the hands; areas which needed protection during fighting, because, unlike the rest of the body, they were not covered by a cloak or helmet. This protective function later disappeared as guns were introduced to the island through trade with Europeans. Tattoos also protected the wearer against other kinds of dangers such as shark bites…
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Trip Like I Do https://www.TattooConcierge.com/trip-like-i-do/ Fri, 19 May 2017 05:51:02 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41274   Highly abstract watercolor body/art comprising a vibrantly colored half-sleeve tattoo. The artwork based on almost a street art, painting […]

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Intricate Watercolor Painting - Full Sleeve Body Art | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Highly abstract watercolor body/art comprising a vibrantly colored half-sleeve tattoo. The artwork based on almost a street art, painting aesthetics. Although quite hard to discern within the single angle shot, a range of specific elements are intertwined throughout including portraits and birds in-flight. Due to the depth and detailing of coloring contrasts, sessions were broken up into multiple dates over months. This was the client’s first tattoo, she’s a true warrior, and it certainly wasn’t her last sitting. Forming part of the TC classics we will be posting a series of detailed water-brush and fine-line pieces offering examples covering an eclectic array of techniques

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Most Valuable Service Awards 2017 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/most-valuable-service-award-2017/ Thu, 18 May 2017 04:59:33 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41248   Very much looking forward to attending the Most Valuable Service Awards Ceremony tonight with Tattoo Concierge receiving it’s eighth […]

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Most Valuable Service Awards 2017 - The Worlds First Body Art Concierge - Body Art - Unique Tattoo Artwork  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Very much looking forward to attending the Most Valuable Service Awards Ceremony tonight with Tattoo Concierge receiving it’s eighth title. It is with deep gratitude that TC accepts the honor. Providing the World’s First Body/Art Concierge Service TC is extremely excited to continually be recognized as a leader in the growth and defining of body/art culture. We look forward to even more successful years ahead and the crew is constantly hard at work, ensuring we’re deserving of the recognition generously bestowed. Thank you all again for your kind support, photos of the event will be posted shortly

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Copyright Protection for Tattoos https://www.TattooConcierge.com/copyright-for-tattoos/ Tue, 16 May 2017 04:08:05 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41209   An interesting, very recent article published in the ND Law Review exploring copyright considerations around tattooing. The rationale for […]

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Copyright For Tattoos - Modern Tattoo Articles - Unique Tattoo Artwork | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
An interesting, very recent article published in the ND Law Review exploring copyright considerations around tattooing. The rationale for copyright protection summarized as ‘promoting progress’ which, may or may not be argued to apply to body/art
 
| ‘Are Tattoos Copies? The practice and ritual of tattooing human skin has existed in all parts of the world and in most cultures for thousands of years. The modern history of tattooing in Western cultures can be traced to the voyages of Captain James Cook to the South Pacific, where sailors encountered various Polynesian tribes among which tattooing was, and remains today, an important cultural practice and spiritual ritual. When these sailors, many of whom had adorned their bodies with tattoos, returned to Europe, they ignited an interest in tattooing known as the “tattoo rage,” which spread through nineteenth-century Europe. This interest in tattooing eventually crossed the Atlantic Ocean to America and, by 1891, due in large part to the development of the first electric tattoo machine by American tattoo artist Samuel O’Reilly, the practice of tattooing began to permeate American society. During the early era of tattooing in America, tattoos were generally associated with sailors, criminals, and circus performers–the artistic value of tattoos received minimal, if any, recognition. In recent decades, tattoos have moved from their counterculture origins into mainstream American society, garnering an appreciation as a valid form of art. Today, tattoos are displayed prominently on the bodies of celebrities and athletes, and they have been the subject matter of exhibits at museums and art galleries. Television shows such as Miami Ink and Ink Master have increased the popularity of tattoos as an art form and have contributed to their increasing social acceptance. As of 2012, approximately twenty-one percent of Americans had at least one tattoo; for Americans under forty years of age, the percentage with at least one tattoo rose to almost forty percent. This increase in the popularity and prevalence of tattoos has led to an estimated tattoo industry annual revenue growth of 2.9% between 2009 and 2014, resulting in an approximate revenue of $3.4 billion.
 
Tattoo artists are aware of the purpose and protections of the United States’ intellectual property regimes. Recently, tattoo artists have initiated lawsuits alleging their possession of intellectual property rights in their works under the United States’ copyright regime. Since 2005, three individual tat too artists have brought lawsuits alleging copyright infringement of their works–either of tattoos based upon preliminary drawings or tattoos created contemporaneous to their application in the client’s skin. The first two cases, Reed v. Nike, Inc, and Whitmill v. Warner Brothers Entertainment, Inc., settled without going to trial; the third case, Escobedo v. THQ Inc., was dismissed for lack of prosecution. After these cases, questions regarding the applicability of the copyright laws to tattoos remain unanswered. While the basic application of the copyright statute indicates tattoos are likely copyrightable subject matter, the courts should be cognizant of the negative policy implications that could arise should tattoos be granted copyright protection. The focus of this Note is on tattoos on human skin, not on a tattoo artist’s drawings, “flash art,” or other forms of art utilized by tattoo artists as inspiration for a tattoo. Therefore, as a preliminary matter, throughout this Note, the term “tattoo” shall be intended to mean the actual work applied to human skin rather than an embodiment of the work in any other form…
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Geometry And Waves https://www.TattooConcierge.com/geometry-and-waves/ Mon, 15 May 2017 03:14:30 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41204   Fine line, black-work composition mirroring a three dimensional wave formation. These comparatively simple geometric waves are frequently implemented to […]

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Geometric Lines In Wave Formation - Shoulder Body Art - The Tattoo Concierge - For Those Defining The Industry | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Fine line, black-work composition mirroring a three dimensional wave formation. These comparatively simple geometric waves are frequently implemented to represent sound synthesis as they have a rich complement in harmonics. Although often depicted in a linear or horizontal alignment the curvature has been wrapped circularly so as to shape the ball of the shoulder. Completed in a very quick single session the composition is part of the TC classics collection, posted in our tattoo art galleries shortly

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Greco Roman Tattoo History https://www.TattooConcierge.com/greco-roman-tattoo-history/ Sat, 13 May 2017 04:29:39 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41180   The role of tattooing in ancient Greek & Roman times, sometimes referred to as ‘tattooing’s dark age’ is quickly […]

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Greco Roman - Tattoo History - Body Art Encyclopedia - Unique Tattoo Artwork | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
The role of tattooing in ancient Greek & Roman times, sometimes referred to as ‘tattooing’s dark age’ is quickly addressed in the latest body/art encyclopedia update
 
 
| ‘Tattooing was widely practiced among the civilizations of the ancient Mediterranean, primarily as a form of punishment for criminals, leading to the modern Western association of tattoos, criminality, and the underclass. Originally, the Greeks did not use tattooing and saw it as a barbaric practice. Contempories of the Greeks who did use tattooing included the Thracians (of Bulgaria and western Turkey), the Egyptians, the Syrians, and the Persians. Tattooing for these groups probably served multiple purposes. The Syrians, for instance, wore tattoos on their wrists that had a sacred significance and runaway slaves who received sacred designs were considered to now serve the divinity rather than their former masters and were freed of service. Thracian tattoo usage found on both men and women could have been decorative as well as serving social purposes. Egyptian tattoos were worn by women and were both decorative and used for ritual purposes. The Persians tattooed slaves and prisoners of war and this was perhaps the source for later Greek tattooing.
 
The Greeks picked up the practice of tattooing in the fifth century BCE and began following the Persian practice of using tattoo marks for punitive purposes. The Greeks tattooed both prisoners and runaway slaves on the forehead, usually with a mark demonstrating their crime. The term stigmata was used to describe tattoo marks by the Greeks and later the Romans. The Romans inherited punitive tattooing from the Greeks and later began marking soldiers as well. They also used branding to mark animals (as did the Greeks) and human slaves, as did the Egyptians. Like the Persians who often tattooed slaves and prisoners with the name of the king, the Romans sometimes marked slaves with the name of their owner. Prisoners of war and soldiers alike were tattooed with the name of the emperor (and soldiers were sometimes marked with a series of dots which may have represented their unit) and many criminals were marked with the sentence rather than the crime…
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Colored Brush Mountains https://www.TattooConcierge.com/colored-brush-mountains/ Fri, 12 May 2017 03:33:25 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41171   Utilizing a slightly Western watercolor variation, these Chinese ink brush mountains have a tighter colored vibrancy in comparison to […]

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Water Color Ink Brush Mountains - Modern Chinese Body Art - The Tattoo Concierge - For Those Defining The Industry | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice

landscape


By the late Tang dynasty, landscape painting had evolved into an independent genre that embodied the universal longing of cultivated men to escape their quotidian world to commune with nature. Such images might also convey specific social, philosophical, or political convictions. As the Tang dynasty disintegrated, the concept of withdrawal into the natural world became a major thematic focus of poets and painters. Faced with the failure of the human order, learned men sought permanence within the natural world, retreating into the mountains to find a sanctuary from the chaos of dynastic collapse. During the early Song dynasty, visions of the natural hierarchy became metaphors for the well-regulated state. At the same time, images of the private retreat proliferated among a new class of scholar-officials. These men extolled the virtues of self-cultivation—often in response to political setbacks or career disappointments and asserted their identity as literati through poetry, calligraphy, and a new style of painting that employed calligraphic brushwork for self-expressive ends. The monochrome images of old trees, bamboo, rocks, and retirement retreats created by these scholar-artists became emblems of their character and spirit

 
Utilizing a slightly Western watercolor variation, these Chinese ink brush mountains have a tighter colored vibrancy in comparison to traditional Asian landscape scenes. Each brushed line and movement was initially painted on rice paper. Due to a variation in pigments as well as paper, often the brighter colors are painted separately with the two portions layered to construct the final composition. The far more vertical alignment lends itself particularly well to side torso placement. The rounded grayer variation for the depth shading will naturally lighten over time thereby creating stronger contrasts with the foreground. The entire piece was completed in a single session, we will be posting more of these styles over the coming months within the ‘TC Classics’ category

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Lorenzos Ink https://www.TattooConcierge.com/lorenzos-ink/ Wed, 10 May 2017 06:47:23 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41155   In line with the movement and structure of the upper thigh / lower abdomen, this TC classic composition utilizes […]

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Lorenzos Skull - Upper Thigh Body Art - Abstract Street Graphic - The Tattoo Concierge - Global Platform | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
In line with the movement and structure of the upper thigh / lower abdomen, this TC classic composition utilizes strong black-work with highly muted single color accents. This more eclectic juxtaposition of disparate elements is closer to an abstract pastiche than any one traditional body art category, such as between the human skull and typewriter text or geometric shapes alongside ink-brush aesthetics. Just as with the inverted ‘r’ of the stencil lettering, there exists a playful dynamic that’s again harder to categorize strictly within one school or under conventional terminology. Quite often in planning for this variety of composition the commissioning client provides either a ‘laundry list’ of elements for inclusion to be selected by the artist during the design creation stage or, simply allows the artist free-range in deciding. The latter option being for the braver few yet with words conveying such specific meanings client feedback of any writing included is usually sought. Larger examples of this style will be posted shortly

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Freak Shows https://www.TattooConcierge.com/freak-shows/ Mon, 08 May 2017 07:21:08 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41134   Continuing with the tattoo and body modification encyclopedia entries, todays’ article covers an historical aspect of tattooing pertaining primarily […]

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Freak Show - Tattoo History - Body Art Encyclopedia  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Continuing with the tattoo and body modification encyclopedia entries, todays’ article covers an historical aspect of tattooing pertaining primarily to Western culture particularly around the 19th century. A quick overview of the the freak show phenomenon
 
| ‘A freak show is an exhibition of physically and visually different people in order to shock, and sometimes educate, viewers. Traveling shows in which human oddities were displayed alongside exotic animals, deformed animals, musicians, jugglers, and other attractions have been popular throughout the Western world, going back to the Middle Ages. In the mid-nineteenth century, human oddities joined what became known as the freak show or ten-in-one, in which multiple attractions were joined together into one show, as part of a stationary or traveling exhibit. In the United States, these exhibits were found primarily in the dime museums (named because admission cost 10 cents) popular in the nineteenth century. These museums were a combination of educational enterprise and entertainment. In 1840, P. T. Barnum became the proprietor of the American Museum, bringing the freak show to prominence. Here the freak show joined the growing popular amusement industry. In the dime museum, tattooed people were exhibited alongside people with disabilities, natural wonders like wild animals, native people, and “gaffes,” “hoaxes,” or manufactured fakes. Since people had never before seen any of these curiosities, the managers and showmen were able to concoct bizarre explanations for their origins, stories which were morally and socially uplifting, as well as “educational”.
 
The showman was an essential component of the freak show. The exhibit, of course, could not be seen before a show and therefore needed the showman to market their particular attractions to the curiosity-seeking public. An essential part of the telling of the tale consisted of wonderfully and medically impossible reasons to explain to the audience the history of the person they were going to see. The most popular attractions were oddities with extraordinary talents, who could do supposedly normal things despite their disabilities…
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Tribal Visions https://www.TattooConcierge.com/tribal-visions/ Sun, 07 May 2017 07:38:08 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=41091   Rather than the stereotypical, solid back shading this particular ‘tribally inspired’ composition utilizes geometric patterns as well as dot-work […]

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Detailed Tribal Artwork And Patterns - Upper Torso Body Art - The Tattoo Concierge | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice

polynesian


Polynesian tattoo style can vary from island to island. It depends on the degree of evolution of various traditions from the original common tattoo designs, like Lapita, which is a former Pacific archeological culture. Ancient original styles mainly consist of some simple patterns, like straight lines, repeating on the body. These geometrical styles can be found in Hawaiian and Samoan tattoo traditions, or in tattoos from Fiji, Palau, Tonga, etc. Because the age is too far from nowadays, the meanings of these patterns are almost lost, or debatable. The most used styles nowadays, which instead consist of rounded patterns, are from Marquesas Island

 
Rather than the stereotypical, solid back shading this particular ‘tribally inspired’ composition utilizes geometric patterns as well as dot-work as the center. Whilst the overall design movement as well as alignment with the muscle groupings is obviously drawn from tribal traditions the possibility to add various depths and dimensions within previously ‘blacked out’ portions is notable. Within the classics galleries we have just two other examples of this style implementing a more colorful geometric tessellation throughout, we will be sure to post more shortly. Completed in two sessions the artwork extends around the upper arm and slightly down across the clavicle

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Facial Tattoos https://www.TattooConcierge.com/facial-tattoos/ Fri, 05 May 2017 03:13:21 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=40922   Body/Art Encyclopedia, explore the latest entry offering a short introduction to the use and history of facial tattoos   […]

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To Moko - Facial Tattooing - Body Art Encyclopedia - The Artists' Choice   | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Body/Art Encyclopedia, explore the latest entry offering a short introduction to the use and history of facial tattoos
 
| “In the West, thanks to the tradition dating back to the Greeks and Romans of tattooing criminals on the face with a mark of their crime, facial tattoos are traditionally the mark of a convict. Even without that explicit connection, facial tattoos are extremely stigmatizing in the non-tattooed world. Most tattooists do not want to contribute to marking an individual for life as an outcast, thus many tattooists will not tattoo on someone’s face. For years, one could also not attend a National Tattoo Association convention with facial tattoos.
 
However, in recent years, facial tattoos have experienced a surge in popularity among the body modification community, especially among those who embrace modern primitivism, partly because of their extreme appearance, and partly because of their connection to “primitive” cultures.
 
Facial tattoos are most well known among Pacific Island cultures such as New Zealand, the Marshall Islands, Tahiti, and Hawaii, as well as some tribes in New Guinea. A great many Native American tribes also practiced facial tattooing. The most well known and classic of all facial tattoos is the Moko, the black curvilinear tattoo worn by Maori men and women as a sign of status as well as affiliation….”
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Thighs And Lace https://www.TattooConcierge.com/thighs-and-lace/ Thu, 04 May 2017 03:51:31 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=40899   Truly a ‘fine-line’ delicate black work composition wrapping around the mid-thigh. When attempting such intricate and tightly spaced pieces, […]

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Fine Lines And Geometry - Wave Detailed - Body Art - Unique Tattoo Artwork  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice

lace


Lace is a delicate fabric made of yarn or thread in an open weblike pattern, made by machine or by hand. Originally linen, silk, gold, or silver threads were used. Now lace is often made with cotton thread, although linen and silk threads are still available. Manufactured lace may be made of synthetic fiber. A few modern artists make lace with a fine copper or silver wire instead of thread. The word lace is from Middle English, from Old French las, noose, strin, from Vulgar Latin *laceum, from Latin laqueus, noose; probably akin to lacere, to entice or ensnare… Lace was used by clergy of the early Catholic Church as part of vestments in religious ceremonies but did not come into widespread use until the 16th century in the northwestern part of the European continent. The popularity of lace increased rapidly and the cottage industry of lace making spread throughout Europe. In North America in the 19th century, missionaries spread the knowledge of lace making to the Native American tribes. St. John Francis Regis helped many country girls stay away from the cities by establishing them in the lace making and embroidery trade, which is why he became the Patron Saint of lace making…

 
Truly a ‘fine-line’ delicate black work composition wrapping around the mid-thigh. When attempting such intricate and tightly spaced pieces, minimum distancing between the lines becomes a key consideration. Meaning as human skin is elastic the artwork itself will be subject to movement and shifting overtime, thereby possibly moving the lines even ever so slightly. Should any artwork be applied that does not adhere to said distancing requirements ensures the possibility of distortion. Levels of detail depicted here could be said to be right on the edge of achievability. As part of the classics series this composition will be displayed in the tattoo art galleries shortly

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Free Speech In Ink https://www.TattooConcierge.com/free-speech-in-ink/ Wed, 03 May 2017 05:05:25 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=40835   Recent article interpreting court cases in America around tattoo artists whilst exploring concepts of free speech and expression as […]

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Recent article interpreting court cases in America around tattoo artists whilst exploring concepts of free speech and expression as it pertains to body/art
 
| “Tattoo artists Tom and Elizabeth Preston jumped through every regulatory hoop that the city of Tempe, Arizona, placed in their way. The couple filed the necessary paperwork for opening a tattoo parlor on the north side of town, paid the necessary fees, and obtained the necessary permits before breaking proverbial ground on a studio called Body Accents. But then, after the Prestons had spent more than $30,000 on renovations, permits, and related costs, Tempe abruptly changed its tune. Their original operating permit was revoked, the Prestons were told, because the proposed tattoo shop might attract an unsavory clientele. The message was clear: Take your inky business elsewhere. But the Prestons had a better idea. They joined forces with the lawyers at the Goldwater Institute, a free market think tank in Phoenix, and filed suit against the city for abusing its regulatory authority and violating their rights. In 2009 Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Robert H. Oberbillig ruled in their favor. The city’s actions were arbitrary and capricious, Oberbillig declared, and the Prestons’ original permit must be reinstated. One year later, Tempe dropped its appeal of the decision and settled the case.
 
“Clearly, we lost money because we couldn’t open the studio three years ago,” Elizabeth Preston observed at the time. But at least the pair were finally able to get on with the business of earning a living. “This lifts such a weight off of our shoulders” Preston v. Hallman was not the first time that the skin-and-ink trade came to grips with the regulatory state, and it surely won’t be the last. Over the past half-century, tattoo artists have been subjected to all manner of overreaching, ill-fitting, and just plain nonsensical government controls. They’ve been hassled by clueless health departments, shut down by moralizing zoning boards, and outlawed entirely by busybody city councils and state legislatures. But tattoo artists can be a prickly bunch, and increasingly they’re opting to fight back. In recent years tattooists around the country have launched a series of civil liberties lawsuits designed to put the government’s regulatory malfeasance on trial. And while the ink-masters aren’t winning every case, their legal attacks are finally starting to turn the tide… continue reading
 
‘A Barbaric Survival’
 
The art of tattooing has been around for millennia, but the modern tattoo industry effectively got its start on December 8, 1891, when a New York City tattooist named Samuel F. O’Reilly received a patent for the electric tattoo machine. Based on the design for Thomas Edison’s autographic printer, which was essentially a motorized engraving tool, O’Reilly’s invention sped up the process of tattooing while vastly improving the quality of the final product. Prior to his innovation, tattoos were done by hand, usually with a set of needles affixed to a wooden handle. Even for the most skilled practitioners, it was slow-going work. During the Spanish-American War of 1898, by contrast, O’Reilly reportedly inked upwards of 130 naval reservists in a single day from his small shop at 11 Chatham Square, located at the southern end of New York’s famous Bowery.
 
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O’Reilly revolutionized the business in other ways as well. As the journalist Albert Parry remarked in his 1933 book Tattoo: Secrets of a Strange Art as Practised among the Natives of the United States, the New Yorker “expanded the choice of materials till it included such old and new stuff as powdered charcoal, finely powdered brick-dust, coal-dust, lamp black, Prussian blue, washing blue, gunpowder, cinnabar, ordinary writing ink, China ink, India ink, and other vegetable inks.” O’Reilly dubbed himself “Professor,” and took on several residents over the years, including future tattoo legend Charlie Wagner, who would go on to work the Bowery until the early 1950s. Today’s tattoo artists and enthusiasts remain in O’Reilly’s debt.
 
Perhaps unsurprisingly, the same city that witnessed the birth of modern tattooing also inaugurated one of the first massive crackdowns on the practice. That effort culminated in 1961, when New York City declared it “unlawful for any person to tattoo a human being,” a prohibition that remained on the books for nearly four decades. Gotham finally relegalized the tattoo trade in 1997.
 
New York’s tattoo ban was a classic case of regulators using a bogus public-health pretext to hound an unpopular activity out of existence. Blaming tattooing–falsely–for a minor outbreak of Hepatitis B, city health officials went on the attack, declaring that “from a public health point of view” the tattoo industry was “not regulatable.” Only a total ban would save the citizenry, the government claimed.
 
Fred Grossman, a tattooist who worked out of a shop in Coney Island, took a different view. He brought suit, charging the city with using its regulatory powers for illegitimate ends. But when his case finally reached the courtroom, Grossman hit a brick wall of judicial indifference.
 
According to state appellate Judge Aron Steuer, “the decoration, so-called, of the human body by tattoo designs is, in our culture, a barbaric survival, often associated with a morbid or abnormal personality.” Tattooists found no refuge in Steuer’s courtroom.
 
Grossman next appealed to the state’s highest court, but it was equally dismissive. “In its wisdom, the board in the case before us decided that the prohibition of lay tattooing was essential for the protection of the public health,” the court ruled in Grossman v. Baumgartner (1966). Because “the police power is exceedingly broad… the courts will not substitute their judgment of a public health problem for that of eminently qualified physicians in the field of public health.”
 
As an authority for that deferential stance, New York’s high court cited the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1938 opinion in the landmark New Deal case United States v. Carolene Products Co. In that far-reaching decision, written by Justice Harlan Fiske Stone, the Supreme Court held that when it came to “regulatory legislation affecting ordinary commercial transactions… the existence of facts supporting the legislative judgment is to be presumed.” In other words, in all constitutional disputes between the government and the businesses it regulates, the scales of justice must be tipped overwhelmingly in favor of the regulators. Needless to say, such sweeping judicial deference spelled doom for New York City’s beleaguered tattoo artists, who were now transformed from law-abiding entrepreneurs to outlaws plying their trade in the shadows.
 
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‘Tattooing Is an Art Form’
 
Carotene Products effectively ended the idea of tattooists challenging regulations from their position as entrepreneurs. But that same decision also planted the seeds for a future counterattack. “More exacting judicial scrutiny,” the Carotene Products Court explained in a footnote, would still be appropriate in other types of cases. For example, judges should not automatically defer to the government in cases involving “a specific prohibition of the Constitution, such as those of the first ten amendments.”
 
The implication of that footnote did not go unnoticed. What if tattooists tried fighting government regulation from their position as artists engaged in the venerable act of free expression, as protected by the First Amendment?
 
In 2000, an award-winning tattoo artist named Stephen Lanphear joined forces with the American Civil Liberties Union and proceeded to pose that very question. Lanphear filed suit against the state of Massachusetts, which had declared it a crime, punishable by up to one year in prison, for any person except a doctor to mark “the body of any person by means of tattooing.”
 
“Tattooing is an art form,” Lanphear argued in his lawsuit. And “the acts of creating and wearing tattoo art are forms of expression protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.” State Superior Court Judge Barbara J. Rouse soon agreed. “The act of tattooing is inseparable from the display of the tattoo itself and is expression protected by the First Amendment,” Rouse held in Lanphear v. Commonwealth of Massachusetts. “Any regulation of the tattooing process must, therefore, comply with constitutional requirements.” The Bay State’s tattoo ban was struck from the books.
 
Six years later, a California tattooist named Johnny Anderson took the fight to federal court, filing a First Amendment challenge against Hermosa Beach’s prohibition on the operation of tattoo shops within city limits. “The tattoo designs that are applied by me are individual and unique creative works of visual art,” Anderson maintained; therefore, he argued, they deserve full constitutional protection.
 
After losing at federal district court, Anderson went on to secure a landmark 2010 victory at federal appellate court, the highest level of the federal judiciary short of the U.S. Supreme Court. “The tattoo itself, the process of tattooing, and the business of tattooing are forms of pure expression fully protected by the First Amendment,” declared a unanimous three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit. It was the tattoo trade’s greatest victory to date against the regulatory state.
 
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‘Sheltered by the First Amendment’
 
The 9th Circuit’s decision in Anderson v. City of Hermosa Beach reverberated in courtrooms far and wide. Two years later, for example, in a decision that repeatedly cited Anderson, the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in favor of tattooists Ryan and Laetitia Coleman in their fight against the Mesa City Council, which had denied them a permit on the grounds that their proposed tattoo shop might increase crime and lower property values.
 
“We conclude that the approach adopted in Anderson is most consistent with First Amendment case law and the free speech protections under Arizona’s Constitution,” the Arizona Supreme Court ruled in Coleman v. City of Mesa. “Anderson starts with the proposition that a tattoo itself is pure speech. This seems incontrovertible.” The Colemans’ tattoo shop was soon open for business.
 
The year 2016 brought even better news for the tattoo world. On January 6 a Florida tattooist named Brad Buehrle convinced the U.S. Court of Appeals for the nth Circuit to overrule Key West’s tattoo ban, opening the way for Buehrle to open a tattoo shop in the city’s historic district.
 
City officials had opposed Buehrle’s enterprise on the grounds that his business would mar Key West’s “character and fabric” and thereby “impact tourism.” The city also maintained that it had a legitimate interest in preventing drunken tourists from getting marked for life.
 
The 11th Circuit thought otherwise. “The act of tattooing is sheltered by the First Amendment,” the court observed. “The right to display a tattoo loses meaning if the government can freely restrict the right to obtain a tattoo in the first place.”
 
The nth Circuit was particularly unimpressed by the city’s flimsy attempt to frame its ban as a proper exercise of government power. “The City conducted no investigation and made no findings,” the nth Circuit observed. “It failed to muster even anecdotal evidence supporting its claims. The closest the City came to presenting evidence on the impact on tourism was a passing reference to a few lines of a Jimmy Buffett song. And we are unsure whether even that reference fully supports its position.” It was not the regulatory state’s finest day in court.
 
Modern American tattooing has come a long way from its humble origins on the Bowery. No longer confined to the bodies of sailors or sideshow freaks, tattoos have entered the cultural mainstream, becoming a familiar sight in the worlds of fashion, pro sports, pop music, and Hollywood. And between the 9th Circuit and the nth Circuit, seven states are now governed by judicial precedent holding the act of tattooing to be fully protected by the First Amendment. Judges in other jurisdictions can’t help but take notice of that.
 
Tattoo artists can’t expect to win every case. But the odds against them don’t seem quite so long anymore”
| (Damon Root, Reason, June 2016)

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Classic Floral Watercolor https://www.TattooConcierge.com/classic-floral-watercolor/ Tue, 02 May 2017 04:59:29 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=40831   The second in the classics series features a vibrantly colored, floral water-brush composition forming a half sleeve. Thick black […]

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Abstract Vibrant Floral - Graphic Lines With Watercolor - The Tattoo Concierge - Global Platform | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
The second in the classics series features a vibrantly colored, floral water-brush composition forming a half sleeve. Thick black almost graphic lines are implemented in place of shading, imparting a more solid structure to the piece as well as balancing out the inverted or negative portions. The graphic lining, which is still slightly reminiscent of ink-brush painting, is then contrasted with softer watercolors for the petals of the flowers. The artwork wraps around the arm – slightly onto the upper back and was completed in two sessions. We at TC look forward to the upcoming releases of both the classics as well a wide variety of new masterworks. Thank you all again for your ongoing support

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Skull Vanitas https://www.TattooConcierge.com/skull-vanitas/ Sun, 30 Apr 2017 04:46:31 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=40716   During the process of vetting a selection of artists from across the globe, Tattoo Concierge will be releasing a […]

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Triple Skull - Fine Line Sketch Body Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice

vanitas


In the arts, vanitas is a type of symbolic work of art especially associated with Northern European still life painting in Flanders and the Netherlands in the 16th and 17th centuries, though also common in other places and periods. The Latin word means “emptiness” and loosely translated corresponds to the meaninglessness of earthly life and the transient nature of vanity. Ecclesiastes 1:2 from the Bible is often quoted in conjunction with this term. The Vulgate (Latin translation of the Bible) renders the verse as Vanitas vanitatum omnia vanitas. The verse is translated as Vanity of vanities; all is vanity by the King James Version of the Bible, and Utterly meaningless! Everything is meaningless by the New International Version of the Bible. Vanitas themes were common in medieval funerary art, with most surviving examples in sculpture. By the 15th century these could be extremely morbid and explicit, reflecting an increased obsession with death and decay also seen in the Ars moriendi, Danse Macabre, and the overlapping motif of the Memento mori. From the Renaissance such motifs gradually became more indirect, and as the still-life genre became popular, found a home there. Paintings executed in the vanitas style were meant to remind viewers of the transience of life, the futility of pleasure, and the certainty of death. They also provided a moral justification for many paintings of attractive objects. Common vanitas symbols include skulls, which are a reminder of the certainty of death; rotten fruit, which symbolizes decay; bubbles, which symbolize the brevity of life and suddenness of death; smoke, watches, and hourglasses, which symbolize the brevity of life; and musical instruments, which symbolize brevity and the ephemeral nature of life. Fruit, flowers and butterflies can be interpreted in the same way, and a peeled lemon, as well as accompanying seafood was, like life, attractive to look at, but bitter to taste. There is debate among art historians as to how much, and how seriously, the vanitas theme is implied in still-life paintings without explicit imagery such as a skull. As in much moralistic genre painting, the enjoyment evoked by the sensuous depiction of the subject is in a certain conflict with the moralistic message…

 
During the process of vetting a selection of artists from across the globe, Tattoo Concierge will be releasing a series of ‘classic’ works. These are pieces completed by a variety of previously represented artists showcasing an eclectic array of styles and techniques. Just as with the reference libraries alongside inked galleries, the possibilities in body art are as varied and diverse as within any artistic medium such as painting. The first in the ‘classic’ series is a finely lined, rougher aesthetic triple skull composition. Created using only black ink there is a significant play on inverted space and proportionality. Completed in a single session, the upper thigh area can often be relatively sensitive in comparison with other areas on the body

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Tattooing In Ancient England https://www.TattooConcierge.com/tattooing-ancient-england/ Sat, 29 Apr 2017 05:09:31 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=40708   The latest entry in the new series exploring the world of body modification, Tattooing In Ancient Britain   | […]

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The latest entry in the new series exploring the world of body modification, Tattooing In Ancient Britain
 
| “Tattooing has been practiced on the island of Great Britain for perhaps two thousand years, starting with the Celts, one of the island’s earliest inhabitants. The term “Briton,” in fact, is derived from a word meaning “painted in various colors.” Caesar, for instance, noted that the Britons “dyed” their bodies with woad; he may in fact have been referring to tattooing. A quote from Herodian, a first-century Roman historian, noted that the Celts, who wore no clothing, “punctured” their bodies with pictures of animals. There is also evidence that contemporary cultures to the Celts, like the Scythians, who were known to have influenced Celtic culture, practiced tattooing. Once the Celts came under Roman control and became Christianized, they soon adopted the wearing of Christian tattoos, as in the style of the Jerusalem souvenir tattoos. This practice may also have been associated, as with the Roman practice, with the marking of slaves and criminals, but it was certainly used by Celtic Christians to mark devotion. After the fifth century when the Roman Empire collapsed, the Celts were pushed westwards, and it is unclear whether Celtic tattooing continued and was able to influence the English practice of tattooing. However, by the Middle Ages, we do know that tattooing was still being practiced in some quarters.
 
For example, Anglo-Saxons continued to practice tattooing, at least among the nobility and warrior classes. Pilgrims, for instance, received tattoos during their travels to the Holy Land, but religious tattoos were not the only tattoos that the English wore. Following the Battle of Hastings in the eleventh century, for example, King Harold’s body was identified only because he had “Edith” tattooed over his heart….”
| full article

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Flash Sheets https://www.TattooConcierge.com/flash-sheets/ Sun, 23 Apr 2017 05:22:53 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=37551   Following the Masterpiece Library ‘renovations’ we have also updated the historic Flash Library. Please kindly note that we in […]

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hannya mask


The Hannya (般若) mask is a mask used in Noh theater, representing a jealous female demon. It possesses two sharp bull-like horns, metallic eyes, and a leering mouth.The Hannya mask is used in many noh and kyōgen Japanese plays, as well as in Shinto ritual kagura dances.[5] The Hannya mask portrays the souls of women who have become demons due to obsession or jealousy. Plays in which a person may wear the hannya mask include Aoi no Ue and Dōjōji; its use in these two plays, two of the most famous of the Noh repertoire, and its distinctive and frightening appearance make it one of the most recognizable Noh masks. The Hannya mask is said to be demonic and dangerous but also sorrowful and tormented, displaying the complexity of human emotions. When the actor looks straight ahead, the mask appears frightening and angry; when tilted slightly down, the face of the demon appears to be sorrowful, as though crying. The oldest hannya mask is dated 1558. Hannya masks appear in various skin tones: a white mask indicates a woman of aristocratic status (such as Rokujō in Aoi no Ue), a red mask depicts a low-class woman (seen in Dōjōji), and the darkest red depicts true demons (revealed after appearing as women, as in Momijigari and Kurozuka)…

 
Following the Masterpiece Library ‘renovations’ we have also updated the historic Flash Library. Please kindly note that we in no way condone or support the use of flash sheets for any composition. These works represent a part of body/art history and provide a wonderful insight into the relatively recent and dramatic change across industry standards. The flash sheets hail from a time when pages of such works would be the only choices presented to clients when walking into ‘red light’ or ‘street side’ studios
 
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old school


Sailor tattoos refer to a type of tattoo traditionally favored by sailors and the traditions that accompany these tattoos. “Old school” tattoos were common among sailors, depicting images like swallows on either side of the chest, girls in sailor hats, and pairs of dice. Sailor Jerry’s work typified this style of tattooing during the early-mid twentieth century. After falling out of style for several decades, these stylized tattoos are regaining popularity again among young people, both sailors and non-sailors. They are particularly favored among tattoo artists themselves. This returning trend is also seen in the increasing popularity of traditional Sailor Jerry designs, nautical tattoos and even clothing printed with stylized sailor tattoo images…

 
Today genuine body art is more frequently defined as the original and or unique collaboration between artist and client. Although there may certainly be various traditional elements and designs that will not be adjusted over the years, the Flash Library offers a snapshot into how perceptions and possibilities in the tattooing world have changed even within the past few decades. The gallery is simplified into one page with images being dynamically cycled so that different works are constantly available
 
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body suit


A body suit or full body suit is an extensive tattoo, usually of a similar pattern, style or theme that covers the entire torso or the entire body. They are associated with freak show and circus performers, as well as with traditional Japanese tattooing. Such suits are of significant cultural meaning in some traditional cultures, representing a rite of passage, marriage or a social designation…

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Masterpiece Library Renovation https://www.TattooConcierge.com/masterpiece-library-renovation/ Sat, 22 Apr 2017 05:45:24 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=33498   The Tattoo Art & Education Guide’s Masterpiece Reference Library has undergone ‘renovations’ with a new series of master-works available […]

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dali


Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, Marqués de Dalí de Púbol (11 May 1904 – 23 January 1989), known professionally as Salvador Dalí, was a prominent Spanish surrealist painter born in Figueres, Catalonia, Spain. Dalí was a skilled draftsman, best known for the striking and bizarre images in his surrealist work. His painterly skills are often attributed to the influence of Renaissance masters. His best-known work, The Persistence of Memory, was completed in August 1931. Dalí’s expansive artistic repertoire included film, sculpture, and photography, in collaboration with a range of artists in a variety of media. Dalí attributed his “love of everything that is gilded and excessive, my passion for luxury and my love of oriental clothes” to an “Arab lineage”, claiming that his ancestors were descended from the Moors. Dalí was highly imaginative, and also enjoyed indulging in unusual and grandiose behavior. His eccentric manner and attention-grabbing public actions sometimes drew more attention than his artwork, to the dismay of those who held his work in high esteem, and to the irritation of his critics…

 
The Tattoo Art & Education Guide’s Masterpiece Reference Library has undergone ‘renovations’ with a new series of master-works available to all. Totaling close to 200,000 images the galleries are segmented according to artists’ names with a handful of specialist categories such as Dali | Monet | Modern Art | Van Gogh and others. The compositions are loaded dynamically with the paintings cycled so new works are constantly available
 
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caravaggio


Michelangelo Merisi (Michele Angelo Merigi or Amerighi) da Caravaggio, 29 September 1571 – 18 July 1610) was an Italian painter active in Rome, Naples, Malta, and Sicily between 1592 (1595?) and 1610. His paintings, which combine a realistic observation of the human state, both physical and emotional, with a dramatic use of lighting, had a formative influence on Baroque painting. Caravaggio trained as a painter in Milan before moving in his twenties to Rome, where he lived and worked for several years, creating a considerable name for himself as an artist and as a violent, touchy and provocative man, until a brawl led to a death sentence for murder and forced him to flee to Naples. In scarcely a year’s sojourn in Naples, he rapidly established himself once more as the one of the most prominent Italian painters of his generation, exploiting high-ranking connections. It was not long before these connections gave him an opening to travel on in 1607 to Malta, governed by the Order of Knights Hospitallers, whose upper echelons were an alliance of European nobility. Caravaggio probably hoped that the Knights would provide a channel whereby he could obtain a pardon from the Papacy. Once more his talents made an instant impression, along with the support of noble patrons, to the point that after a year’s novitiate the Grand Master of the Order made him a knight. It seems to have been another brawl, this time with an aristocratic knight, and the arrival of news from Rome of his pending sentence there that led to his arrest and imprisonment at Valletta in October. His hopes dashed, he contrived to escape and flee at once, which before the end of 1608 led to his cancellation from the rolls of the Order. He made for Syracuse in Sicily, where he was received as a guest by a friend from his Roman days, and executed a number of works…

 
Just as with the appearance and positioning of body art – quite often eclectic juxtapositions occur. The Masterpiece library purposefully mirrors a similar aesthetic, sources for inspiration can come from anywhere. We hope that the library continues to perhaps provide a ‘classical’ alternative to both artists’ and clients seeking to bring their ideas, concepts and or visions to life
 
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magritte


René François Ghislain Magritte (French: [ʁəne fʁɑ̃swa ɡilɛ̃ maɡʁit]; 21 November 1898 – 15 August 1967) was a Belgian surrealist artist. He became well known for a number of witty and thought-provoking images. Often depicting ordinary objects in an unusual context, his work is known for challenging observers’ preconditioned perceptions of reality. His imagery has influenced pop, minimalist and conceptual art…

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In The Wind https://www.TattooConcierge.com/in-the-wind/ Wed, 15 Feb 2017 09:52:03 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16951   A half-back, delicate freehand Chinese ink brush tattoo art composition for our friend Sam. Completed in just two quick […]

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In The Wind - Ink Brush Bamboo - Half Back Chinese Inspired Modern Body Art | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A half-back, delicate freehand Chinese ink brush tattoo art composition for our friend Sam. Completed in just two quick sessions with the entire piece drawn on using markers before commencing with the application. The movement in the bamboo tailors across the right half back with the intricacies in the leafs varying from sharp contrasts to a much softer water-brush aesthetic throughout the stalk. Similar to the practice of Wu Wei and traditional Chinese art within this aesthetic, the inspiration is found through the emotions alongside the works life on the ‘canvas’. A short time-lapse video of the sessions is being compiled and will be released shortly. Such a pleasure working with you on this Sam and an honor to have both you as well as your lovely wife here. We hope you’re able to visit again soon

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Living With Integrity https://www.TattooConcierge.com/living-with-integrity/ Fri, 03 Feb 2017 05:46:32 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16912   A single large Chinese ink brush calligraphy tattoo art work positioned on the upper right back. Created on rice-paper […]

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Single Brush Piece - Upper Shoulder Blade - Chinese Calligraphy Art -  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A single large Chinese ink brush calligraphy tattoo art work positioned on the upper right back. Created on rice-paper with essentially a single movement, a much larger traditional brush was utilized to capture this highly dynamic and fractured texture. The movement of the writing has been tailored so as to balance alignment with the center spine as well as the side torso, its’ two ending curved portions in direct opposition. This calligraphy art was crafted to be a stand-alone composition with the existing circular graphic as well as partially viewed shoulder tattoos not completed at the studio. Thank you once again for your kind patience and we look forward to seeing you for your next piece shortly

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Question Of Calligraphy https://www.TattooConcierge.com/question-of-calligraphy/ Sun, 22 Jan 2017 06:02:06 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16832   question | “I’m curious to know why the character deviates from standard script. For example the first stroke is […]

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In Front Of The Temple - Client Submitted Photo - Tattoo Concierge - The Tattoo Concierge 2017 | Tattoo Concierge Of The Tattoo Concierge | Unique | Living | Art | www.TattooTemple.com | www.Tattoo ConciergePang.com
 
question | “I’m curious to know why the character deviates from standard script. For example the first stroke is usually a long vertical stroke but it looks more like a shorter dash. The 东 one of the strokes is shorter and looks like a smaller dash or “点” , etc. Is the beauty manifested in the deviations which demonstrate Tattoo Concierge’s artistic expression?” |
 
answer | This essentially comes down to a consideration of hand-prepared Chinese calligraphy versus computer font. The oldest form of writing is the chop or seal format. This was the first standardized structuring of the language and was constrained to what were more or less boxed pictographs. For authentic Chinese calligraphy there are over 20 distintive recognized variations and five major schools according to historical periods. Each having an entirely different formula in writing almost every character. Some being markedly more legible whereas others requiring significant study and or understanding of the art form to even decipher, running script as one example. Secondly genuine calligraphy is hand-prepared with every character or indeed every appearance of each character being unique. It’s said that Chinese calligraphy is the most reflective medium of the artists’ personality, capturing a glimpse of their ‘chi’ [energy]. Each movement and line permanently inscribed. Chinese calligraphy must indeed vary from the ‘standard’ font as each composition in calligraphy, when prepared by an artist, is substantially unrepeatable. Just as within the plethora of Latin based language font styles, variations between writing any letter can be huge however this does not mean that there inherently exists a required form. There can be recognized quintessential archetypes of specific structures yet flexible requirements of adherence throughout implementation. The conveyance of meaning possibly only amplified through personalized, or at least stylized, representations. Here being almost a convergence of written conveyed meaning, semiotics and artistic latitude
 
All in all Chinese calligraphy pieces are hand-crafted compositions based on one of the schools or styles in the art form as well as the particular movements of the composing artist; not only set font types. There can be extremely limited space in contrasting these works against textbook depictions. I suppose one possible analogy would be a comparison of a photographed portrait to a Picasso; they convey totally different interpretations of say a woman’s’ face yet can both be recognized as such with the latter held as far more influential for many

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Wholehearted https://www.TattooConcierge.com/wholehearted/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:03:31 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16747   A single line of abstract, almost geometrically influenced Chinese ink brush calligraphy tattooed from the ribs running down slightly […]

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Wholehearted - Single Line Chinese Ink Brush Geometric Calligraphy -  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A single line of abstract, almost geometrically influenced Chinese ink brush calligraphy tattooed from the ribs running down slightly below the waistline. This specific style of water brush writing merges sweeping fluid portions alongside sharper, graphically persuaded strokes. Considering the absence of an alphabet all direct translations of authentic quotations or phrases is generally impossible, suffice-it to say the theme or inspiration reflects a wholehearted dedication towards action. Inspiration was derived from an English phrase which was then extensively researched with the closest approximate mutually selected for the artwork. Such a pleasure working with you Alessandro, safe travels and grazie mille

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Top 35 Tattoo Blogs https://www.TattooConcierge.com/top-35-tattoo-blogs/ Sat, 07 Jan 2017 06:06:59 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16703       Very humbling for us to win one of the spots in the ‘Top 35 Tattoo Blog’ awards […]

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Tattoo-Concierge---Winner-Of-Best-Tattoo-Blogs-2017---The-Artists-Choice
 
 
 
Very humbling for us to win one of the spots in the ‘Top 35 Tattoo Blog’ awards from Feedspot. We are privileged enough to be listed among such publications as Inked, FYeahTattoos, Tattrx, as well as the Tattoo’d Lifestyle Magazine websites. Whilst we appreciate that we do not specialize in the same eclectic and disparate breadth of coverage many of these sites offer, we’re truly grateful for all your kind support
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Standing In Sunlight https://www.TattooConcierge.com/standing-in-sunlight/ Thu, 05 Jan 2017 06:37:06 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16714   A finely lined, delicate series of Chinese calligraphy extending from the upper shoulder down just above the waist line. […]

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Standing In Sunlight - Single Line Chinese Brush Calligraphy - The Tattoo Concierge - Global Platform | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A finely lined, delicate series of Chinese calligraphy extending from the upper shoulder down just above the waist line. Created in thinner ink-brush the tattoo artwork retains the extremely sharp tracer movements originally captured on rice-paper. This particular scroll of writing was selected by Rachel, from the multiple hand-prepared options created for her composition, due to the slightly more formalized depiction of the first character. Completed in less than a single afternoon sitting, thank you both for traveling all the way down for your composition. Safe travels ahead and we hope to cross paths again somewhere in the USA over the coming years
 
 

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Octopoda https://www.TattooConcierge.com/octopoda/ Wed, 04 Jan 2017 08:15:01 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16671   A single watercolor octopus tattoo artwork with ink-splash elements and tentacles extending from the side torso, across the lower […]

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Ink Brush Octopus For Erin | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A single watercolor octopus tattoo artwork with ink-splash elements and tentacles extending from the side torso, across the lower back then down along the opposing hip. Created using a graphic mixture technique, the artwork’s detailed lines are first drafted implementing fine tipped pens with additional movements, textures and variations brought out through complimentary abstract ink brush. Depiction in a fluid, varied watercolor aesthetic is particularly suitable considering; using a network of pigment cells and specialized muscles in its skin, the common octopus can almost instantaneously match the colors, patterns, and even textures of its surroundings”. Completed in just two sessions there are three distinct stages for the artwork’s creation prior to both freehand drawing as well as placement at the sitting itself. A short time lapse feature of the ‘Octopoda’ creation, filmed in our private studio, will be released shortly. We can’t tell you what a pleasure it’s been working with you Erin and do hope your able to make it back to South East Asia sometime over the coming years

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Water And Flames https://www.TattooConcierge.com/water-and-flames/ Thu, 29 Dec 2016 11:08:23 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16633   A full back, highly abstract ink brush composition created for and worn by our dear friend Emery. The Lady […]

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Lady Of Water And Fire - Full Back Abstract Ink Brush Chinese Art | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choicerm
 
A full back, highly abstract ink brush composition created for and worn by our dear friend Emery. The Lady of Water And Flames is emerging from fluid brush strokes with the surrounding, delicately shaded goldfish seeming to come to life through her gesture. The sharply lined, finely detailed elements offer a balance to the softer color textures. Originally painted in watercolor, which allowed the palette differentiation to distinguish various elements, through a mutual decision this was adjusted to monochrome right before commencing. A complexity within the ink-brush is counterbalanced by inverted spacing of the figure, hair and flames – all of which remain open. Completed during a number of sittings spaced over roughly one year, we can’t thank you enough for your kind patience
 
 

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Happy Holidays 2016 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/happy-holidays-2016/ Sun, 25 Dec 2016 03:33:09 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16623     Wishing everyone around the world the happiest of holiday seasons! Thank you all for your kindest, ongoing support […]

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Happy Holidays - Unique Tattoo Artwork | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
 
Wishing everyone around the world the happiest of holiday seasons! Thank you all for your kindest, ongoing support and we’re looking forward to a series of major developments alongside new product releases in 2017. We hope that the coming year proves to be the best one yet for your all, sending festive hugs from the Tattoo Concierge crew
 
 

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Art For Juri https://www.TattooConcierge.com/art-for-juri/ Tue, 20 Dec 2016 11:00:11 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16542   Flowing, abstract Chinese calligraphy artwork tattooed from the ribs to upper thigh. This four character composition utilizes a running […]

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Abstraction For Juri - Chinese Running Calligraphy  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Flowing, abstract Chinese calligraphy artwork tattooed from the ribs to upper thigh. This four character composition utilizes a running script technique where the entire series is connected through a single brush line. This not only truncates the spacing between characters, essentially required in all others, yet also captures the life of the writing in a unique manner. Without the ability to pause and compose individually the skill alongside foresight required can be argued to convey a deeper appreciation of the entire phrase. Completed in a single session, thank you for your kind patience Juri. A genuine pleasure creating this with you

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Paradoxical Insights https://www.TattooConcierge.com/paradoxical-insights/ Sun, 18 Dec 2016 04:02:04 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16532   A more contemplative artwork featuring a thickly brushed, strong black ink, single Chinese character tattooed on the side torso. […]

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Contemplative - Single Brush Character - Paradoxical Insights | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A more contemplative artwork featuring a thickly brushed, strong black ink, single Chinese character tattooed on the side torso. Completed in just one sitting this was crafted as a stand-along composition with no additional elements to be added. The bolder writing aesthetic with spacing are again a reflection of the meaning conveyed. The artworks’ positioning is slightly more aligned towards the center abdomen so as to see portions of the writing from a front view with the full character partially hidden if holding the left arm down by the side. Truly appreciate your patience, you made it through your session so peacefully! We look forward to seeing you again soon
 
 

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Art For Aneta https://www.TattooConcierge.com/art-for-aneta/ Mon, 05 Dec 2016 08:13:52 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16178   A delicately aligned, two character, large brush stroke Chinese calligraphy tattoo artwork. Placed smoothly in line with the curvature […]

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Open - Chinese Ink Brush Calligraphy Body Art - Unique Tattoo Artwork | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A delicately aligned, two character, large brush stroke Chinese calligraphy tattoo artwork. Placed smoothly in line with the curvature of the back rib cage, implying movement towards the obliques. Despite being a comparatively shorter composition the significant empty space around can be seen as a reflection of the meaning of the phrase itself. Crafted in a slightly more abstract technique, both characters were written using a single brush movement. With the application completed in less than a single afternoon we can’t thank you enough for your patience and flying all the way down for your session Aneta. Keep thinking about your next composition and we hope to visit you shortly
 
 

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Ink – The Art Of Tattoo https://www.TattooConcierge.com/ink-the-art-of-tattoo/ Sat, 03 Dec 2016 06:59:39 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16147   A genuine honor to be featured in the new ‘Ink, The Art Of Tattoo’ book from Victionary. We have […]

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Ink---The-Art-of-Tattoo-00-cover - Soft Back Tattoo Book - TattooConcierge.com - The Artists Choice - 2016  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A genuine honor to be featured in the new ‘Ink, The Art Of Tattoo’ book from Victionary. We have a four page spread alongside other such outstanding artists as Dots To Lines, Ben Hopper, Ilya Brezinski and a handful of others

| “The concept of immutability is deeply intertwined in tattoo culture. The act in itself is bold, and lines are defined, literally and figuratively. Tattoos have long been the physical adhesive that banded together individuals in subcultures spanning from American biker culture to regional gang affiliations. Driven by pride and rebellion, the motivation and purpose behind tattoos today have diversified as the art form continues to expand. Contemporary tattoo follows the modern age that we live in – one of ever-expansive accessibility due to the constant growth of technology. The Internet and ease of transportation have caused the world to shrink. Where tattoos were once symbols of locality and personal heritage – clear and defined in association to geography and affiliations – now, for tattoo artists and enthusiasts alike, tattoo art can latch onto styles that pique everyone’s interest

 
Ink---The-Art-of-Tattoo-3 - Soft Back Tattoo Book - TattooConcierge.com - The Artists Choice - 2016 | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
Ink---The-Art-of-Tattoo-5 - Soft Back Tattoo Book - TattooConcierge.com - The Artists Choice - 2016 | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
Ink---The-Art-of-Tattoo--4 - Soft Back Tattoo Book - TattooConcierge.com - The Artists Choice - 2016 | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
The idea of contemporary tattoo describes designs that actually breaks from what we ses as conventional. Not only that artists are taking influences and connecting together imagery from entirely different cultures, often centuries apart and completely disparate from their own, people who want to get tattooed also start looking tinto non-tattoo artists portfolios for fresh ideas and potential designs to eschew the seen. As a result, tattooing continues to ses a growing blend of styles, elements and imagery, expanding into uncharted territory with new and unique styles… the art is growing exponentially, and adding more work to the colossal archive of the past centuries will only add to the progression of the art form as a whole” |
 

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Statuesque https://www.TattooConcierge.com/statuesque/ Thu, 01 Dec 2016 08:02:11 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16142   A sweeping, four character Chinese ink-brush calligraphy tattoo art piece running from the ribs to upper thigh. Completed in […]

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Statuesque - Side Brush Calligraphy Tattoo Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A sweeping, four character Chinese ink-brush calligraphy tattoo art piece running from the ribs to upper thigh. Completed in a single afternoon session the script style, although bold and legible, contains portions of running or ‘grass-script’ abstraction. This is usually most easily recognized through the joining of characters in a cursive style brush movement. A time lapse video of the application will be released shortly and shows far more fractured detailing across the strokes of the characters, a feature that is slightly harder to discern from the photo alone. Congratulations again Anthony – you were so peaceful during your session and make an excellent model. Looking forward to seeing you again shortly

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Prayer Taking Flight https://www.TattooConcierge.com/prayer-taking-flight/ Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:01:26 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16112   Full back, ink brush wings with Siddham prayer script running along the center spine. Commissioned in 2012 and completed […]

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Prayers Taking Flight - Full Back Abstract Ink Brush Wings And Tibetan Script  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Full back, ink brush wings with Siddham prayer script running along the center spine. Commissioned in 2012 and completed over multiple sessions, thank you so much for coming back all these years later for the photos Nick! Created entirely with calligraphy water-brush the wings are inverted whereas instead of depicting the full ‘plumage’ negative space, i.e. clients’ skin tone, is utilized as an essential portion of the composition. Each stroke painted on canvas was meticulously re-created to capture the organic sense of movement and contrast. The artwork further depicts a shadowing effect transitioning from darker to far smoother, lighter ink-brush feathers that echo the concept of duality; a sentiment expressed within the writing. Completed over a number of sessions it was a pleasure getting to know you and we look forward to seeing you in the studio soon

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Sharply Fractured https://www.TattooConcierge.com/sharply-fractured/ Fri, 25 Nov 2016 10:07:51 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16098   Quite abstract, sharply fractured Chinese ink-brush calligraphy running down the side torso accentuated through thinner red paint-brush splatter highlights. […]

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Sharply Steve - Fractured Ink Brush Calligraphy And Splatter  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Quite abstract, sharply fractured Chinese ink-brush calligraphy running down the side torso accentuated through thinner red paint-brush splatter highlights. Starting roughly in line with the pectoral and ending on the upper-hip, this move across the waistline typically does not allow the artwork to be seen in-full from any single angle. This effect further compliments the flow of the body whilst resembling traditional scroll compositions. The full artwork was completed in one session. Thank you so much as always Steve, you make an outstanding model. Hope to see you shortly
 

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Calligraphy For Maxi https://www.TattooConcierge.com/calligraphy-for-maxi/ Tue, 22 Nov 2016 05:21:33 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16043   Flowing set of four Chinese characters created in ink-brush calligraphy, the tattoo art work extending from upper ribs down […]

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Calligraphy For Maxi - Single Line Sexy Chinese Inspired Body Art  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
Flowing set of four Chinese characters created in ink-brush calligraphy, the tattoo art work extending from upper ribs down to her thigh. Painted in a legible yet stylized aesthetic, portions contain ‘grass’ techniques featuring connected strokes. To have this effect the entire set of writing must be created in a single movement, i.e. never lifting the calligraphy brush off the canvas. This joining between the characters not only slightly truncates spacing between yet also forms a stronger continuity, complimenting placement. The singly more horizontal line of the third character having been purposefully tailored to accentuate the hip with a fine line brush movement over the obliques, drawing one’s eye towards natural curves. Such a pleasure seeing you again after so many years Maxi! We wish you safe travels ahead and look forward your next session, whenever this may be
 
 

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Novembers’ Dialogue https://www.TattooConcierge.com/novembers-business-dialogue/ Mon, 21 Nov 2016 10:11:20 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16018   Very flattered to be speaking at an upcoming business gathering about our work and philosophy   | November’s WE […]

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we-dialogue-tattoo-temple-speaking-at-business-leaders-gatthering-creative-startups-outside-tech-2016 | www.TattooTemple.com | Unique | Living | Art
 
Very flattered to be speaking at an upcoming business gathering about our work and philosophy
 

| November’s WE Dialogue is about passionate people who have founded creative and unique startups. We have Vincent Siu, founder of Press Start Hong Kong, the first-of-its-kind games and events venture in Hong Kong; Kalo Chu, founder of Kalo Make Art, a Modern western calligraphy workshop and bespoke invitation design and printing service; Christine So, founder of Hosbby, a platform to help people make money with their hobbies and a community to discover unusual experiences; and a representative of Tattoo Concierge, managing one of the top ten tattoo studios in the world that makes tattooing a living art and with a very, very long waiting list |

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Poised https://www.TattooConcierge.com/poised/ Sun, 20 Nov 2016 08:02:03 +0000 https://www.TattooConcierge.com/?p=16031   A Chinese ink-brush tattoo artwork of a solitary tiger poised on a mountain top. The central tiger element was […]

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Poised - Chinese Ink Brush Tiger On A Mountain - Upper Sleeve  | The Tattoo Concierge | www.TattooConcierge.com | The Artists Choice
 
A Chinese ink-brush tattoo artwork of a solitary tiger poised on a mountain top. The central tiger element was created using calligraphy brushes on specialist scroll paper with the surrounding elements ‘freehanded’ during the session. The tigers’ body shows a greater level of contrast and shading gradation within the technique. The stripes more pronounced, softer gray-scale alongside a more significant use of inverted spacing particularly around the face. This lighter watercolor aesthetic has to be sufficiently separated from the similarly fluid background elements, both in monochrome, yet the composition still offers an increased depth in comparison to the more solid black ink-brush technique. Although smaller than most pieces the tiger is accented through fine line trees / natural elements that wrap up from the upper arm as well. The entire artwork was completed in just two sittings. Thank you again Peter and excellent to have you here in the studio
 

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